On the Literary Genetics of Shakspere's Poems & Sonnets

By T. W. Baldwin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
From Pistol to Plotinus

Falstaff, as he and his await the new king's coming in 2 Henry IV, V, 5, 25 ff., lauds his own zeal and constancy. "Fal. But to stand stained with travel, and sweating with desire to see him; thinking of nothing else, putting all affairs else in oblivion, as if there were nothing else to be done but to see him." Whereupon Pistol comments, "'Tis 'semper idem,' for 'obsque hoc nihil est:' 'tis all in every part;"1 and Shallow agrees: "'Tis so, indeed." On the "all in every part," Warburton had pointed out; "The sentence alluded to is, 'Tis all in all, and all in every part." Then Ritson noted2 that a Latin statement of this doctrine appears in The Phoenix Nest 1593 (S. R. October 8, 1593): "Tota in toto, et tota in qualibet parte." Malone next added two contemporary English renderings of this doctrine concerning the soul.3. In Drayton's Mortemeriados, 1596 (S. R. April 15, 1596):

And as his soul possesseth head and heart, She's all in all, and all in every part.

In Nosce Teipsum, 1599 (S. R. April 14, 1599), by Sir John Davies:

Some say, she's all in all, and all in every part.4

____________________
1
The quartos read, "Tis in every part."
2
Malone, Variorum ( 1821), Vol. XVII, p. 233.
3
Ibid
4
The editions of 1599 and 1602 do not have "every." Cf. also in the same work:

So doth the piercing Soule the body fill, Being all in all, and all in part diffus'd.

See also The First Part of Feronimo, II, 4, 2-6:

You are as like Andrea, part for part, As he is like himselfe . . . . . . I could not think you but Andreas selfe, so legd, so facst, so speecht, So all in all

( Boss, F. S., The Works of Thomas Kyd, p. 316). The Latin form of the statement occurs in Pedantius: "Dro. Quod ad documenta aulicalia attinet, me audi. Primum, dissimulandum est profundissime (hoc est in Aulico totum in toto & totum in qualibet part)" (Smith, G. C. M., Pedantius ( Materialen, Vol, VIII), 11. 1435-37). Professor Smith notes on this passage, "S. Thom. Aq. Sum. Th. I. 77, I ad I: totum universale adest cuilibet parti secundum totam suam essentiam et virtutem, ut animal homini et equo, et ideo proprie de singulis partibus praedicatur, totum vero integrale non est qualibet parte, neque secundum totam essentiam neque totam virtutem et ideo nullo modo de singulis partibus praedicatur, sed aliquo modo...de omnibus simul, ut si dicamus, quod paries, tectumm et fundamentum sunt domus.

"Javellus supra III lib. de Anima, III. 6: Si anima intellectiua est tota in toto et tota in qualibet parte.

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
On the Literary Genetics of Shakspere's Poems & Sonnets
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 404

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.