On the Literary Genetics of Shakspere's Poems & Sonnets

By T. W. Baldwin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
Something on Chronology

From our winnowing of the chaff of ages have emerged a very few hard won grains of apparent fact. First and foremost, the bulk, and presumably all, of these surviving sonnets was written from about 1593 to about 1599. This conclusion rests fundamentally on long accepted literary relationships, controlled by external facts. The fundamental principle of these literary relationships has been to discover the basic source of origin and thence to determine direction of evolution, just as in manuscript relations. Division into series has no bearing here, but is an independent and correlative by-product of our examination. The majority of these fundamental relationships and all the external facts have long been known and accepted. I have simply gathered them and put them together to discover what their genetic pattern would tell us. The facts, both internal and external, are sufficiently numerous and have stood the acid test of scholarly examination for a sufficient length of time to neutralize the combined personal equations of previous scholars and to minimize my own.

Perhaps it should here be emphasized that in our study we have not used parallels as such; there is always a base from which to determine direction of development. The base may be found to be inadequate, the direction of development as indeterminate; that is, some of our instances may be found to be only parallels and so useless in this analytical framework. But parallels as such have not been used.

There have, of course, been efforts in the past to use parallels. Ordinarily, these would need to be reduced to statistical level in order to be interpreted. Such a test is that of twice-used words. It is a simple matter now to test this idea statistically. The letters A and B in Bartlett's Concordance will be sufficient. So far as I can see, each of the plays represented is about equally yoked with every other play by twice-used words. I find no significant statistical incidence at all to indicate relative chronological position. If twice- used words yield no statistical significance, neither, it would appear, could twice-used phrases as such, as advocated by Beckwith. At

-340-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
On the Literary Genetics of Shakspere's Poems & Sonnets
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 404

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.