Around the World in Eighty Days

By Jules Verne | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXVII
IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT UNDERGOES, AT A SPEED OF
TWENTY MILES AN HOUR, A COURSE OF MORMON
HISTORY.

DURING the night of the 5th of December, the train ran south-easterly for about fifty miles; then rose an equal distance in a north-easterly direction, towards the Great Salt Lake.

Passepartout, about nine o'clock, went out upon the platform to take the air. The weather was cold, the heavens gray, but it was not snowing. The sun's disc, enlarged by the mist, seemed an enormous ring of gold, and Passepartout was amusing himself by calculating its value in pounds sterling, when he was diverted from his interesting study by a strange-looking personage who made his appearance on the platform.

This personage, who had taken the train at Elko, was tall and dark, with black moustaches, black stockings, a black silk hat, a black waistcoat, black trousers, a white cravat, and dogskin gloves. He might have been taken for a clergyman. He went from one end of the train to the other and affixed to the door of each car a notice written in manuscript.

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