Lincoln and the Bluegrass: Slavery and Civil War in Kentucky

By William H. Townsend | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Notes
CHAPTER 1
1. About June 5, 1775. George W. Ranck, History of Lexington, Kentucky . . . ( Cincinnati, Clark, 1872), 18; Lewis Collins, History of Kentucky . . . , rev. by Richard H. Collins (2 vols., Covington, Collins, 1874), 11, 179.
2. Lexington Kentucky Reporter, July 29, 1809.
3. y " Lexington is nearly central of the finest and most luxuriant country perhaps, on earth." Gilbert Imlay, A Topographical Description of the Western Territory of North America ( 2d ed., London, Debratt, 1793), 48.
4. "It was unanimously resolved to perpetuate the first opposition by arms to British tyranny, by erecting in the then wilderness, a monument more durable than the pyramids of Egypt to the memory of these citizens murdered. A monument lasting as the foundations of the Universe, and also to perpetuate their own devotion to the sacred principles of Liberty. They consecrated the new town by the name of Lexington. Such was the origin of the name of the town of Lexington." Kentucky Reporter, July 29, 1809.
5. The London "Cheapside" was an open square, famous in the Middle Ages for its fairs and markets and later for its fine stores.
6. These are still preserved in the newspaper files of the Lexington Public Library.
7. J. N. McCormack (ed.), Some of the Medical Pioneers of Kentucky ( Bowling Green, Kentucky State Medical Association, 1917), 53.
8. F. A. Michaux, Travels to the West of the Alleghany Mountains . . . (2d ed., London, Crosby, 1805), 194-97. As the traveler approached Lexington, "Everything seems to announce the comfort of its inhabitants. Seven or eight were drinking whiskey at n respectable inn where I stopped to refresh myself on account of the excessive heat." Ibid., 121.
9. William Henry Perrin, The Pioneer Press of Kentucky . . . ( Louisville, Filson Club, 1888), 16.
10. Lexington Kentucky Gazette, March 12, August 20, 1805.
11. Albert J. Beveridge, The Life of John Marshall (4 vols., Boston, Houghton, 1916-1919), 111, 291.
12. Kentucky Reporter, October 24, 1808; August 12, 1809.
13. Kentucky Gazette, November 9, 1811.

-359-

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Lincoln and the Bluegrass: Slavery and Civil War in Kentucky
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • One - Athens of the West 1
  • Two - The Lincolns of Fayette 16
  • Three - The Early Todds 25
  • Four - The Little Trader from Hickman Creek 30
  • Five - Mary Ann Todd 46
  • Six - Slavery in the Bluegrass 70
  • Seven - Grist to the Mill 81
  • Eight - The True American 99
  • Nine - The Lincolns Visit Lexington 120
  • Ten - Widow Sprigg and Buena Vista 141
  • Eleven - A House Divided 157
  • Twelve - Milly and Alfred 176
  • Thirteen - The Buried Years 192
  • Fourteen - Storm Clouds 209
  • Fifteen - Rebellion 239
  • Sixteen - Stirring Days in Kentucky 269
  • Seventeen Problems of State and In-Law Trouble 299
  • Eighteen - With Malice Toward None 320
  • Nineteen - Lilac Time 352
  • Bibliographical Notes 359
  • Index 387
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