The Art of the Middle East Including Persia, Mesopotamia and Palestine

By Leonard Woolley | Go to book overview
Save to active project

FOREWORD

When the publishers paid me the compliment of asking me to write this book I was induced to accept by the fact that it was to be lavishly illustrated throughout in full colour. Now that the text is written I have the unhappy conviction that for the public too the attraction will consist in the illustrations alone.

To many readers a large proportion of the pictures will be familiar. That was inevitable, because those objects which best represent the art of their period have necessarily figured in other books; their being reproduced here in colour may redeem them from banality. Some readers may be shocked by the omission of their favourite masterpieces; but room had to be left for monuments illustrating the art of times or regions less well known. In the wide field which the book attempts to cover there are familiar tracts and tracts of which we are more or less ignorant: where actual remains are abundant and of artistic merit it is tempting to go overmuch into detail and the risk is that we miss seeing the wood for the trees; where objects happen to be few and of less intrinsic worth it is only too easy to overlook the importance they may possess for the history of art -- perhaps the art of another age and of a different land. I have tried to select such documents as best illumine my text, even at the cost of rejecting much that was in itself attractive.

For some of the photographs I am indebted to the generosity of my friend Sir Julian Huxley, for many I have to thank the technical skill of Mr. J. Skeel and M. J. A. Lavaud and, not least, the kindness of the Directors of the museums who have allowed the objects in their charge to be photographed for me -- the Directors of the British Museum, of the Louvre, of the Museums of Damascus, Baghdad, Beirut, Ankara, Istanbul, Philadelphia, Kansas, Chicago, Yale and the Villa Giulia.

Lastly I would express my gratitude to Herr Holle for the labour he has spent upon a book which in its production at any rate is a model of what such a book should be. Leonard Woolley

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Art of the Middle East Including Persia, Mesopotamia and Palestine
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 259

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?