The United States and Cuba: Business and Diplomacy, 1917-1960

By Robert F. Smith | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER SEVEN

Concessions to Cuban Nationalism:
The Price of Co-existence

I

The Crowder mission, the increase in the sugar tariff, and the increasing control of the sugar industry by American bankers all contributed to a development of anti-American feeling in Cuba. The first symptoms of this feeling appeared in 1921, and after the first few months of the 1922 "moralization" program the public protests against American policy increased.

After the cabinet reorganization in June 1922, one Havana newspaper came out with double-page headlines declaring, "HATRED OF NORTH AMERICANS WILL BE THE RELIGION OF CUBANS." This paper went on to warn that, "the day will have to arrive when we will consider it the most sacred duty of our life to walk along the street and eliminate the first American we encounter."1 An American writer in Cuba reported that there was a growing fear of actual intervention and complete American domination. This writer further stated that this Cuban fear of losing their independence was stimulated by the Crowder mission and the absorption of the sugar industry by American banks. The resulting anti-American feeling was even displayed in the advertisements of Cuban firms selling American goods. 2

On June 20, 1922 the Cuban Senate adopted a set of resolutions protesting against American interference in the affairs of the Cuban Government, and calling for adherence to the Root interpretation of the Platt Amendment. This action reflected the general feeling of the Zayas administration. President Zayas had

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The United States and Cuba: Business and Diplomacy, 1917-1960
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 256

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?