The Grand Domestic Revolution: A History of Feminist Designs for American Homes, Neighborhoods, and Cities

By Dolores Hayden | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
1
I am using Linda Gordon's definition of "feminist" as "sharing in an impulse to increase the power and autonomy of women in their families, communities, and/or society." As she notes, the nineteenth-century terms, "the woman movement," and "advancing" the position of woman, are more exact, but have no convenient adjectives attached. Woman's Body, Woman's Right: A Social History of Birth Control in America (Harmondsworth, England: Penguin Books, 1977), xiv.
2
A "grand domestic revolution," Stephen Pearl Andrews , The Baby World, 1855, reprinted in Woodhull and Claflin's Weekly, 3 ( June 8, 1871), 10, and 3 ( October 28, 1871), 12. Other phrases were also popular: "grand cooking establishments," Caroline Howard Gilman (writing under the pseudonym Clarissa Packard), Recollections of a Housekeeper ( New York: Harper, 1834); "eating houses," Jane Sophia Appleton, "Sequel to the Vision of Bangor", in Jane Sophia Appleton and Cornelia Crosby Barrett, eds., Voices from the Kenduskeag (Bangor, Maine: D. Bugbee, 1848); "cooperative housekeeping," Melusina Fay Peirce , "Cooperative Housekeeping I", Atlantic Monthly, 22 ( November 1868), 513-524; "socialization of primitive domestic industries," Feminist Alliance, as reported in "Feminists Debate Plans for a House", New York Times, April 22, 1914; "the big socialized kitchen," Anita C. Block, "Woman's Sphere," editorial, New York Call, July 20, 1913, 15; "coordination of women's interests," Ethel Puffer Howes, 1925 (name of research institute at Smith College).
3
The general term to socialize domestic work will be used throughout the book to describe various proposals with one underlying aim: to make private domestic work social labor. In the popular usage of American psychology, individuals are often said to be "socialized" or made to conform to societal expectations and norms, but I will use "socialize" in its original sense, to refer to the process of reorganizing work to suit the common needs of a social group. Socialized labor does not

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