Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate States Armies

By J. B. Hood | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII.
.

SIEGE OF ATLANTA--ENGAGEMENT OF THE 28TH OF JULY--
WHEELER, IVERSON AND JACKSON--BATTLE OF JONESBORO'--
EVACUATION OF ATLANTA

IN accordance with the valuable diary of Brigadier General Shoupe, I find naught to record after the battle of the 22d beyond the usual shelling by the enemy, till the 26th of July when the Federals were reported to be moving to our left. This movement continued during the 27th, when I received the additional information that their cavalry was turning our right, in the direction of Flat-rock, with the intention, as I supposed, of interrupting our main line of communication, the Macon Railroad. We had lost the road to Augusta previous to the departure of General Johnston on the 18th, and, by the 22d, thirty miles or more thereof had been utterly destroyed.

The Federal commander continued to move by his right flank to our left, his evident intention being to destroy the only line by which we were still able to receive supplies. The railroad to West Point, because of its proximity to the Chattahoochee river, was within easy reach of the enemy whenever he moved far enough to the right to place his left flank upon the river. Therefore, after the destruction of the Augusta road, the holding of Atlanta--unless some favorable opportu

-193-

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