Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate States Armies

By J. B. Hood | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV.

CORRESPONDENCE WITH SHERMAN--CITATIONS ON THE RULES OF WAR.

ABOUT the time I exchanged with General Sherman the two thousand (2000) prisoners above mentioned, the following correspondence passed between us, in relation to his treatment of the non-combatants of Atlanta:

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
"IN THE FIELD, ATLANTA, GEORGIA, September 7th, 1864.

" GENERALHOOD, Commanding Confederate Army.

"GENERAL:--I have deemed it to the interest of the United States that the citizens now residing in Atlanta should remove, those who prefer it to go South, and the rest North. For the latter I can provide food and transportation to points of their election in Tennessee, Kentucky, or further North. For the former I can provide transportation by cars as far as Rough and Ready, and also wagons; but, that their removal may be made with as little discomfort as possible, it will be necessary for you to help the families from Rough and Ready to the cars at Lovejoy's. If you consent, I will undertake to remove all the families in Atlanta who prefer to go South to Rough and Ready, with all their moveable effects, viz., clothing, trunks, reasonable furniture, bedding, etc., with their servants, white and black, with the proviso that no force shall be used toward the blacks, one way or another. If they want to go with their masters or mistresses, they may do so; otherwise they will be sent away unless they be men, when they may be employed by our quarter-master.

-229-

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