Development of Class Structure in Eastern Europe: Poland and Her Southern Neighbors

By Aleksander Gella | Go to book overview

Preface

In this volume Professor Gella provides some much-needed background to what is going on in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe in this era of glasnost' and perestrojka. For, the social-historical makeup and sociological parameters of the Eastern bloc continue to influence how the Soviet Union deals with its client states--both in theory and in practice. Success in these enterprises depends as much on what the Bloc looks like as on what the Bloc is.

Professor Gella undertakes a difficult task when he tries to analyze, in non-Marxist terms, a set of problems that have been thoroughly misanalyzed by innumerable Marxist-Leninist authors. This is done expertly in the case of the notions of 'class', 'intelligentsia', and even the very notion of ' Eastern Europe'. Professor Gella does this by knowledgeably combining the presentation of historical data with sociological analysis that calls on the best available sources. The maps in the appendix provide invaluable aid for the former task, while the bibliography fills the reader in on the latter.

Clarity on the past and present of key Soviet client states will, it can be hoped, help us to understand the possibilities and pitfalls of the Soviet policies of glasnost' and perestrojka. What is more, Professor Gella's non-Marxian approach to what is generally called 'class analysis' constitutes a refreshing contrast with that of Marxist-Leninist dogmatists and under-informed Western sociologists. It is how Marx himself, pace Lenin, might have approached the subject.

THOMAS J. BLAKELEY*

PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT BOSTON COLLEGE

____________________
*
Author's Note: Professor Thomas J. Blakeley is former Editor-in-Chief of Studies in Soviet Thought and author of many works on Sovietology and Marxism.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Development of Class Structure in Eastern Europe: Poland and Her Southern Neighbors
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Part One - The Time of Estate Order 1
  • 1 - A General View on the History of Eastern Europe 3
  • 2 - Poland Until World War II 9
  • 3 - Czechoslovakia Until World War II 29
  • 4 - Hungary Until World War II 38
  • 5 - Romania Until World War II 47
  • Part Two: From Estate to Class Order 55
  • 6 - The Peasantry 57
  • 7 - The Nobility and the Bourgeoisie 84
  • 8 - From the Proletariat to the Working Class 109
  • 9 - The Intelligentsia 130
  • Part Three - The Period of Destruction 165
  • 10 - The Effects of World War II on Social Structure 167
  • 11 - Structural Changes Introduced by the Imported Revolutions 194
  • Maps 203
  • Abbreviations 215
  • Notes 217
  • Bibliography 271
  • About the Author 309
  • Name Index 311
  • Subject Index 314
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 328

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.