poured into his playing did not seem to belong to the correct, formalized Consort who, in all else, seemed bereft of feeling.

When the Princes went away, Princess Victoria "cried bitterly, very bitterly." She thought Prince Albert the "more reflecting of the two" and wrote to King Leopold,

"I have only now to beg you, my dearest uncle, to take care of the health of one now so dear to me and to take him under your special protection. I hope and trust that all will go on prosperously and well on this subject now of so much importance to me."

Prince Albert settled down to his studies again, adding new stores of facts to his receptive intelligence. All that he wrote of his English visit was that the journey had given him "such a disgust for the sea" that he did not even wish to think of it, and that he had found Princess Victoria "very amiable."


{13}

1836-1837

FOR ten months, before Prince Albert and his brother went to their university, they lived under the astute eye of King Leopold in Brussels.

"The masters selected for us are said to be excellent,"
Prince Albert wrote to his stepmother,
"so that everything is favorable to our studies, and I trust there will be no lack of application on our part."
He wrote also, "After all our fatigues and amusements we are now settled in our new home, and are really glad to be able to lead a quiet and regular mode of life." Sometimes he tore himself away from his books, to shoot sea gulls or to watch field days with King Leopold's army. But Albert resented these diversions. When his father summoned him to Coburg for Christmas he answered,
"I am afraid we must deny ourselves that pleasure. Such an expedition would require five or six weeks and our course of study would be quite disturbed by such an interruption."
It seemed that he was preparing for marriage as a career rather than as an experience of the heart.

King Leopold's powers of cold concentration are revealed in the way he controlled his many interests during this time. By administering homeopathic doses of liberalism to the Belgians he had already brought them peace and comparative security. He was making a nation out of a discontented people, surrounded by enmity. He also found time to control every step in the education of the Princes, and when they

-32-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
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  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
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  • {86} 213
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  • {99} 252
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  • {107} 271
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  • {109} 274
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  • {111} 278
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  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
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  • {123} 310
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  • {125} 314
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  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
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  • {140} 343
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  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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