tion, and open to conviction if good arguments are brought forward. When he thinks himself right he only wishes to have it proved that he misunderstands the case, to give it up without ill-humour. He is not inclined to be sulky, but I think that he may be rendered a little melancholy if he thinks himself unfairly or unjustly treated. "1

King Leopold sent one more note of advice, on the day of the wedding, recalling the rule of his married life with Princess Charlotte. He asked the Queen "never to permit one single day to pass over ein Missverständnis, however trifling it might be." He urged them to begin with the same rule.

" Albert is gentle and open to reason,"
he wrote.

On the morning of her marriage, February to, Queen Victoria paused to write Prince Albert a little note which she folded and sent to him. It ended,

"Send one word when you, my most dear beloved bridegroom, will be ready."
She signed it, " Thy ever-faithful Victoria R."

Prince Albert's heart was still in Coburg. He wrote to his grandmother, before the wedding,

"In less than three hours I shall stand before the altar with my dear bride! In these solemn moments I must once more ask your blessing, which I am well assured I shall receive, and which will be my safeguard and my future joy! I must end."
With a touch of anxiety he added,
"God help me!"


{22}

1840

THE morning of the wedding was dismal, with rain and shadows, but the people surged about Buckingham Palace, climbed the trees and covered the fences, from dawn, to see the cavalcade drive past. Political prejudices and old resentment were overwhelmed by the promise of a great occasion. The crimson carpet was spread upon the palace steps; the doors opened and the Coburg Princes came out, in their dark green uniforms. Prince Albert was dressed as a British Field Marshal and he wore the ribbon of the Order of the Garter, the greatest honour of chivalry the Queen could give him. When he stepped into the wet space before the palace, trumpets split the air, colours were lowered and the soldiers presented arms, as to a sovereign. He drove with his father and brother to St. James's Palace, and waited.

-55-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
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  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
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  • {86} 213
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  • {107} 271
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  • {109} 274
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  • {111} 278
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  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
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  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
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  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
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  • {140} 343
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  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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