already urged that a century should pass before new scientific discoveries were admitted into Cambridge. This "dread of innovation" shocked Prince Albert. He invited the Vice-Chancellor to Windsor and, on his own home ground, he was able to present his argument. The Vice-Chancellor demurred at first. It was so hard, he said, to convince the heads of colleges that there was merit in change, but he went back to Cambridge, full of the Prince's ideas. The ideas prospered; a plan of reform was drawn up, with broader fields for study and more opportunities for honours. The scheme was described as

"broad enough to satisfy the demands of all moderate reformers"
and it was adopted by a "triumphant majority." The Vice-Chancellor declared that the Prince's election had brought "a new and glorious era" in academic history. 2 The Times, which had always been niggardly with praise for Prince Albert, said the nation owed him a "debt of gratitude" as he had been the
"first to suggest, and the most determined to carry out,"
the changes. The Examiner, equally critical of what he had done in the past, congratulated the "student of Saxe-Gotha " for having "weighed Cambridge in the balance" and found it to be "a sham." Even Punch, which had always pilloried him, allowed Leech to draw the Prince
"taking the Pons Asinorum, after the manner of Napoleon taking the Bridge of Arcola."


{35}

1847-1848

A NEWSPAPER reporter who saw the Prince arrive in Scotland, in August, wrote that he

"looked pleased with everything, and everybody, and with himself too."
The Prince was delighted and told the Duchess of Kent that
"the reporter was right."

He tramped the hills for a day or two, at the beginning of the summer holiday, but he was soon deep in German politics. He wrote the surprising statement, out of keeping with his education, that the " political reformation of Germany" lay "entirely in the hands of Prussia" and said that

" Prussia had only to will, in order to accomplish these results."
He wrote a letter to the King of Prussia, urging him to realize that the day was past when monarchs might make treaties without consulting the wishes of their people. The King did not welcome the Prince's liberal ideas. Then the Prince set down his opinion of Lord Palmerston, that he acted "less upon principle" and was "still obstinate,"

-93-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
  • {102} 262
  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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