with the Queen but with Prince Albert. He had

"tears in his eyes, "
1 as he explained his case to the Prince who
"purposely did not interrupt"
and allowed the apparently contrite statesman to declare his
"duty and gratitude"
to the Queen. When the hour of conversation ended, Prince Albert turned once more to his busy desk and wrote down a report of many pages, to be put away in his crowded files. At the end he recorded that he had found Lord Palmerston
"low and agitated ... almost to make me pity him."
He recorded also that the Prime Minister thought
"what had passed had done a great deal of good."

But Lord Palmerston's tears were momentary. There was no change in his method and, back in the Foreign Office, he resumed his old habits and his

"bland smile."


{42}

1850

THERE were two gestures to refresh the Queen and the Prince before the year ended. While they were at Balmoral, surrounded by the people they loved,

"primitive, true-hearted and without guile,"
a Scottish laird passed by with fifty of his men. When the laird, Forbes of Strathdon, saw the turrets of Balmoral, he paused beside the River Dee, took off one of his shoes and filled it with whisky. Then all the fifty Scotsmen drank the Queen's health and passed on.

The second compliment came after the Prince spoke in praise of Sir Robert Peel, at York, on his way back to London. There was a storm of praise and when he arrived at Buckingham Palace he was able to read in The Spectator,

"He has never made a speech in public, on any occasion of mark, without suggesting matter for useful thought ... there is an individuality about them [the speeches], which stamps their real authorship. ... If he were removed from us, we should miss one of the least obtrusive, but most useful of our public men."


{43}

1851

WHEN the Queen and the Prince arrived in London, the glittering palace in Hyde Park was almost complete. It was one thousand feet

-116-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
  • {102} 262
  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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