feathers and train! She will be dressed quite simply in white, with a train of white antique moire, both this and her gown to be trimmed with cornflowers. She will wear a wreath of the same flowers on her head. " 6


{58}

1855-1856

THE romance at Balmoral mingled with the war news. The Russians were still clinging tenaciously to the north side of Sebastopol and when Prince Albert arrived in London he found the people still eager to pursue the war. The dockyards and arsenals were working as never before, but there were grumbles over the slow progress of the Army. New generals were needed and when General Simpson resigned, from a sense of his own deficiency, no two giants in Whitehall seemed able to agree as to who should be appointed Commander-in-Chief. Lord Palmerston wrote to Prince Albert, "To find any officer against whom nothing can be said implies the choice either of such men as Wellington or Napoleon, or of men who have never been employed at all; and that of itself would be an absolute disqualification." 1 Prince Albert suggested that the Army should be divided into two Army Corps, each under the command of a senior officer of high position and subject to the general control of the Commander-in-Chief. The plan was accepted and Lord Palmerston wrote to the Prince, "I and all the other members of the Cabinet feel greatly obliged to Your Royal Highness for having suggested an arrangement which had not occurred to any of us."

There was no gratitude or satisfaction in the Prince's diary; only despair. He wrote, "I have endured frightful torture. I continue to suffer terribly." Rheumatism was creeping deeper into his body and crippling him. The insistent flame of duty needed more fuel than he had to give and 1855 closed with the first sign that he was exhausted by his own ardour and the long hours at his desk. Also, he was continuously harassed by his old enemy in Fleet Street. He wrote to his brother, "Soon there will not be room enough in the same country for the Monarchy and The Times. The first wishes to do good, the latter is satisfied with doing mischief. The people bear the sacrifices of the war without grumbling; they love their Queen and adore her, her army and her navy. . . . " 2

-144-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
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  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
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  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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