being constructed in two years, which should have been spread over twelve."

While India was still tormented by spreading mutiny, the British government had to consider the future, and frame measures for transferring control from the India Company to the Crown. This problem brought the Prince Consort and the Prime Minister close together, and Lord Palmerston, forgetting all spite, generously thanked the Prince for his help. The Prince Consort's ideas were constructive as ever; his knowledge of the conditions and needs of India uncanny in a Prince whose thoughts had always been pinned to the map of Europe. Then came news of success. Lucknow was relieved and the beleaguered city blessed Colin Campbell's name. But the bitterness engendered between Britons and natives in India was more terrible than before. Lord Canning wrote from India of the "rabid and indiscriminate vindictiveness" of those "who have been sitting quietly in their homes from the beginning, and have suffered little from the convulsions around them, unless it be in pocket." Queen Victoria thought "no punishment ... severe enough" for the "perpetrators of these awful horrors" but she agreed that those "brown skins" who were innocent should not suffer.


{63}

1858

AN ATTACK on the life of Napoleon III, by conspirators who had hatched their plot in England, was the first anxiety of the new year. Hand grenades, filled with detonating powder, were thrown beneath the Emperor's carriage by members of the Carbonari Society. The heavy, armour-plated carriage, which had been made for Louis Philippe, was wrecked. The Emperor was slightly injured and one hundred and sixty people near him were either killed or wounded. The grenades were examined and proved to have been made in England. The carefully nursed friendship between the two countries became sour with recrimination and malice. French officers urged the Emperor to invade England, since it harboured and encouraged assassins; twenty thousand Londoners gathered in Hyde Park and cried, "Down with the French." The Prince Consort's flights of idealism, shared with the Emperor in the gardens of Osborne, lost their power when the feelings of the multitude were released. The Emperor persisted in his friendli

-153-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
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  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
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  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
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  • {80} 190
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  • {84} 204
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  • {86} 213
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  • {107} 271
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  • {109} 274
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  • {111} 278
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  • {115} 289
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  • {123} 310
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  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
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  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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