ness, but the harm done was to percolate far into the relationship between the two countries for a long time. Queen Victoria, now accustomed to assassins, set down an account of the attack in her diary, with details of wounds and blood. She noted that the Empress was " wonderfully composed and courageous," and added, "even more than he."

The first sign that the attack on the Emperor was more than an incident of the hour came in February when Lord Palmerston yielded to the pressure of the French Foreign Minister and introduced a Conspiracy Bill before the House. The strength of the government had already been tested with the measure for transferring the control of India to the Crown. In this, Palmerston enjoyed a partial win, but only after a battle of words. The Conspiracy Bill failed; the Ministry was defeated and Lord Derby was asked to form a government, against his wishes. The Prince Consort reached deeper gloom. He wrote to his brother of a "Tory Ministry with a radical programme, carrying out republican measures with a Conservative majority, against Liberal opposition. "1


{64}

1858

TEN days after the attempt on the life of the Emperor, the Princess Royal was married. She had celebrated her seventeenth birthday two months before. On the day of the attempt on the life of the Emperor, Queen Victoria had gone to see the rooms prepared for her daughter's honeymoon and had written, "Very pretty. It quite agitated me to look at them. Poor, poor child!" But there was vigilance with the sadness. There had been a hint that leading Prussians objected to the heir to their throne being married away from his own country. This stirred the Queen to fine indignation, in a letter to the British Ambassador in Berlin. "The assumption of its being too much for a Prince Royal of Prussia to come over to marry the Princess Royal of Great Britain IN England is too absurd. ... Whatever may be the usual practice of Prussian Princes, it is not every day that one marries the eldest daughter of the Queen of England." Then the absolute decision, "The question therefore must be considered as settled and closed." Also, she examined the programme for her daughter's reception in Berlin with great care. There was the item, "Sunday 7th, Church and Théâtre Paré . " Part of the pattern of life, in changed England, was zeal for Lord's Day ob

-154-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
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  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
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  • {80} 190
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  • {84} 204
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  • {86} 213
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  • {109} 274
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  • {111} 278
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  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
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  • {123} 310
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  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
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  • {140} 343
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  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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