but was sentenced to an "entirely separate establishment," with his governor and an equerry.

More than half a century later, his grandsons were to mix into the heart of university life; one was to be fined for smoking in the streets of Cambridge and the other was to wander through the cloisters of Magdalen with a banjo under his arm. If the Prince Consort could have had his way, there would have been no pleasures for Prince Albert Edward. But universities also enjoy their kind of divine right, and professors and tutors at Oxford were used to the frailties of the young. The Prince was asked to parties, and he was liked. Dean Liddell thought him the "nicest fellow possible, so simple, naïf, ingenuous, and modest, and moreover with extremely good wits; possessing also the royal faculty of never forgetting a face."

The Prince Consort approved what he described as "convivial meetings" at dinner with "the most distinguished men of the place." General Bruce forbade smoking. But Oxford was not Bonn. It became a genial habit among the tutors and students to give the Prince tobacco on the sly. The Colonel's ban turned his pupil into a devoted and inveterate smoker for the rest of his life.


{71}

1860

AT THE beginning of 1860 the Queen wrote to her uncle, "I never remember spending a pleasanter New Year's Day, surrounded by our children and dear Mama." Prosperity was returning, to financiers, industrialists and farmers, and the defences of the country were reassuring. There was only the unpredictable mind of Napoleon III to haunt this good beginning of the year. England had remained aloof from his war, and she insisted on remaining equally aloof from Italy's experiments and the continuous wrangling between the European powers. "We wish well to Italy," declared The Times, "but 'we do not go to war for an idea.' " The only concession was innumerable pages of advice to the European countries: pages of which the Prince Consort gladly supplied his share. Mr. Disraeli pleased most people when he said, in January, "What is the moral that I draw from these conflicting opinions? It is that Italy is at the present moment in a state far beyond the management and settlement of Courts, Cabinets and

-169-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
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  • {109} 274
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  • {115} 289
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  • {123} 310
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  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
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  • {138} 338
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  • {140} 343
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  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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