stadt. All this made it clear to us that Princess Alexandra is the only one to be chosen.

"But now we must see that this marriage is not looked upon as a triumph for Denmark over us and Prussia, and that it came about without the Danes knowing about it, without the knowledge of our Ministers and the Cambridges, but quite alone, through the mediation of our Prussian children . . . if we wish to found a happy future for Bertie we have no other choice. ... I do not know if it is prudent to let you know all this. ... "


{80}

1861

WHEN the Prince Consort opened the Royal Horticultural Gardens on June 5, five of his children stood beside him, in deep mourning for their grandmother. The sombreness was increased by the Prince's own "pallid and somewhat worn look. "1 He was vexed by the continuous load of European troubles: complications following the death of Cavour, rumours that the King of Italy would surrender Sardinia to France, and arguments over the plans for the unification of Germany. But the disaster that struck nearest the heart and pocket of Britain, was the outbreak of the Civil War in the United States in April. The Americans who had sought the oneness of nationhood in the War of Independence, also begun in the month of April, were already divided among themselves. The immediate perils arising from the war, for Britain, were the threat to the Canadian frontier and the fall in supplies of cotton for the Midland mills. The first was met by sending troops to the colony; the second defeated the government for they failed to find sufficient cotton from India and other sources to keep the mills busy. During the entire war these districts in England suffered terrible privation and depression.

Late in October the Court went to Windsor. On the I8th, the King of Prussia had been crowned. A letter arrived for the Prince Consort which allowed him to hope that his ideas would not die with him; that the evening hours of discussion with his eldest daughter had not been wasted. Lord Clarendon wrote to the Queen, "LordClarendon has had the honour to hold a very long conversation with her Royal

-190-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
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  • {86} 213
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  • {104} 266
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  • {107} 271
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  • {109} 274
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  • {111} 278
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  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
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  • {123} 310
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  • {125} 314
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  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
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  • {140} 343
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  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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