the summer following the defeat of her country. Queen Victoria allowed the Prince and Princess to go to Denmark, but before they left they were cautioned against the dangers of expressing opinions. The Prince assured Lord Palmerston,

"I sincerely trust that nothing I may say during my visit to Copenhagen would give annoyance to the Queen or H. M. Government."
He took his wife to the sad home of her parents. Then, as a show of neutrality, they went to see the Crown Princess and her husband in Germany. The Prince already thought his sister "too German in England and too English in Germany." His growing dislike for Prussia was fed when he saw his brother-in-law, appearing before the Princess of Wales "flaunting . . . a most objectionable ribbon which he received for his deeds of valour??? against the unhappy Danes. " 9


{89}

1864

WHEN the newspapers pilloried the Queen for her Prussian sympathies, Lord Palmerston sent her one of the cuttings with a letter in which he dared to say,

" ... this paper, and others which have been mentioned to Lord Palmerston, tend to show that your Majesty has expressed personal opinions on the affairs of Denmark and Germany which have embarrassed the course of the Government."
"Pilgerstein is gouty and extremely impertinent,"
the Queen wrote to her uncle. Of the attacks she said that she
"must be content to see unjust remarks in obscure newspapers and must continue to disregard them."
When the armistice was declared between Prussia and Denmark, she wrote,
"By giving time, the passions on all sides will be calmed and cooled down. "

The Queen gave another example of her restraint, when Garibaldi visited England in 1864. Lord Palmerston observed that it was "useful" that Garibaldi had been taken up by the aristocracy as this did not leave him free to be taken up by agitators. Some of the ladies at the Duchess of Sutherland's party for Garibaldi had curtsied to him. The Prince of Wales hurried from Sandringham to London to meet the "rebel," in his "red shirt and blue-grey cloak."

" What do you think of the Prince of Wales and Garibaldi? "
Disraeli wrote.1 "For a quasicrowned head to call on a subject is strange, and that subject a rebel!"

The Queen watched the "extravagant excitement" from the distance of Windsor and deplored her son's action. To her, Garibaldi was a

-221-

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