the dangers of grief. She wrote,5 " My only desire is to continue as He, my beloved Angel, would have wished — and yet I know and feel how many things and how many relationships have altered, and that I must find help and consolation where I can. And yet I would almost rather sit and weep and live only with Him in spirit and take no interest in the things of this earth, for I believe that I am going further away from him and do not always see things so clearly as I used to!"

It was true that she was "going further away from him," and beginning to form judgments based on living facts, not on dead memoranda. This was proved in the change in her feeling for Prussia. At last she divined Bismarck's true aims and praise turned to violent blame. She wrote to her uncle during the negotiations following the defeat of the Danes, "Prussia seems inclined to behave as atrociously as possible, and as she has always done. Odious people the Prussians are, that I must say."


{90}

1842-1883

THE relationship between Queen Victoria and her Scottish servants, especially the gillie, John Brown, prompted gossip while the Queen was alive and was an incentive to malicious writers after she died. Those who did not comprehend the Queen's extraordinary and almost eccentric devotion to her personal attendants, and her unreasonable bias in favour of everything Scottish, were left wondering why she allowed John Brown such liberty of speech and intimacy, especially after the Prince Consort's death. Brown became almost a nineteenth-century reincarnation of the jesters of Tudor and Stuart times, a Will Somers, mocking his betters to their face. The world outside did not know the history of the relationship and fell for the charms of invention ... some even whispered that the Queen had married John Brown in the Scottish Church. When one considers the character and nature of the Queen, and the moral integrity of those who served her, this is ludicrous. Women like Jane Lady Churchill, Jane Marchioness of Ely and Lady Augusta Stanley, who knew the Queen's life from hour to hour, would have retired from the Court, had the relationship between the Queen and her servant been other than mere folly. The curious innocence wrapped in with this folly was revealed when Brown

-224-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
  • {102} 262
  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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