of making Arthur too much of a regular young officer, especially one belonging to a corps connected with much riding etc. ... " Unconsciously, the Queen was regretting the theories of her husband, who would have associated gentleness in his sons with lack of self-discipline, which he had revered so much.

The Queen was careful also in guarding her younger children from the influences of Marlborough House and confessed to Major Elphinstone3 that although her heir was "very much improved," she thought it better that Prince Arthur should "not come much in contact" with the Prince of Wales whose "habits of amusement" were "too constant." She relied on the "kindness of heart" of her eldest son and was sure "he would never say what he ought not to Prince Arthur." The Queen was justified in trusting her eldest son's talent for dividing his pleasures from his duty to the young. We read of him, in 1873, apologizing to Lord Granville for leaving the House of Lords, early, because he was celebrating the birthday of his "eldest little girl." He wrote, 4

"The Princess and I are going to take four of the children to the circus at 7.15, and it is now 6.30. I have not a moment left."
The Prince was a good parent and already careful lest he repeat the errors of his own schoolroom. He said to Lady Augusta Stanley, some years later,
"We were perhaps a little too much spoken to and, at least, we thought we could never do anything right, anyhow."
He was happy, he said,
"not to have to be always at"
his own children. He showed a talent his father had lacked, for giving his children pleasure and instruction, hand in hand.


{92}

1865-1866

THE last important figure of Queen Victoria's early years, King Leopold, was preparing for death. He lived long enough to enjoy the last flourish of his power, and died soon enough to escape its results. In the spring of 1864, his daughter Charlotte and her husband, the Emperor Maximilian, had sailed for Mexico in an Austrian warship.

Bismarck had called Coburg the "royal stud farm" of Europe. King Leopold had enough imagination to go beyond this and try to capture thrones in the New World as well. Through his influence his greatnephew married the daughter of the Emperor of Brazil. With the support and encouragement of Napoleon III, his daughter and her husband

-230-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
  • {102} 262
  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
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  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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