ferent religion from our own, there is no reason why he should be treated as a brute." He was shocked by the "rude and rough manner " 9 with which the political officers treated the native chiefs. What he saw and realized during the journey coloured all his future relations with the Indian princes and he never forgot what he wrote to his mother,

"Natives of all classes in this country will, I am sure, be more attached to us if they are treated with kindness and with firmness at the same time, but not with brutality or contempt."

The Serapis left for England in March, 1876, laden deep with tigers, leopards, elephants, ostriches, a bear, and a noble Arab horse. The Prince had sixty-five mammals and almost an hundred birds to house when he arrived home. The ship passed Aden, where the Prince was greeted by the Union Jack, then Perim, where he saw the flag again, then Suez. This time, the heir to the throne steamed through a canal which had become partly British while he had been in India. The shares had been bought and British control was creeping deeper into Egypt. In time, the Egyptians neglected their overlord in Constantinople, the "Lord of Two Continents," the "Shadow of the Most High," and the "Protector of Kings." In dingy business offices in Cairo and Alexandria, in post offices and cafés, they hung, instead, highly coloured lithographs of the Queen of half the world.


{109}

1876

MR. GLADSTONE'S imagination was an English growth, within the shores of the seagirt isle, but Mr. Disraeli had travelled in the Orient, from which he drew his blood, and his imagination played about the edges of the world. He was dazzled by the prospect of an "imperial country" and had whispered to the Queen of these ambitions, enough to make her appreciate his "lofty views" of the position Britain should hold. The King of Prussia had listened to his tempter and had been rewarded in the Galerie des Glaces at Versailles, where he was proclaimed Emperor. Queen Victoria also had her tempter, to dazzle her with the mirage of imperial grandeur; but where Bismarck thundered his way with cannon, Disraeli used the guile and charm of an Oriental storyteller. Early in 1876, while her son was still abroad, the Queen revived an old wish to be proclaimed Empress of India. To whisper of

-274-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 437

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.