A wave of glittering glasses lifted towards her and she responded with a "pretty smiling bow, half a curtsy. "

Then the splendour gave way before the Queen's inherent simplicity. Lord Beaconsfield asked her if she was wearing all the jewels the Indian Princes had sent her and she answered,

"Oh, no; if you like I will have the rest brought in after dinner for you to see."
So they were carried into the room, in "a series of small portmanteaux" and the Queen spread out the prizes of her power for all to enjoy.


{111}

1876-1877

THE Queen, the Prince of Wales, and Lord Beaconsfield were of one opinion over the Turkish atrocities in the Balkans, and over the gap between the peaceful protestations of the Tsar and the warlike mien of his generals. They were equally united in fear of what the "monstrous" Bismarck might do as the tide of the war spread. The Queen wrote,

"It is clear Englandcannot fight for the Turks, but she also cannot fight against them."
Mr. Gladstone became young with zeal as he sat before his desk at Hawarden. Among the papers he left when he died were the notes of the work he was engaged on at the time — Future Retribution. With the notes was a docket on which he had written,
"I was called away to write on Bulgaria."
Between August 28 and September 4, 1876, he was in great pain and had to spend one day in bed with lumbago. He went to church twice, read some of St. Thomas Aquinas on the Soul, with Waverley thrown in "as a treat." He also wrote a pamphlet, The Bulgarian Horrors and the Question of the East, of which forty thousand copies were sold in a few days. The season of hibernation for the prophet of Liberalism was over. Once more he stood in the rain, at Blackheath, and stirred his listeners with his talk of "the flood-gates of lust" and the "dire refinements of cruelty," in Turkey.

On April 21, 1877, Russian soldiers crossed the Turkish frontier, thus dispelling all doubts as to the intentions of their rulers. Britain's compassion for the martyred Christians turned into material anxiety for the safety of Egypt, where the new harbour at Alexandria had just been built, with English capital. The British government demanded and received an assurance from Russia that the countries and water‐

-278-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
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  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
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  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
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  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
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  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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