streets of Cairo, and of her son "behaving like a veteran" under "the hottest fire." 4 Prince Arthur came home with a trophy for his mother: the fine Turkish carpet from Arabi's tent. The Queen stood on the carpet in the quadrangle of Windsor Castle, while she pinned medals on the tunics of her soldiers. The pride with which she walked on the carpet of the vanquished Egyptian did not relax when the fate of Arabi Bey was decided. The Khedive dismissed him with the lenient sentence of exile in Ceylon and Lord Dufferin thought 5 it would be

"a good thing"
if the government,
"and still better her Majesty,"
would send
"a personal message to the Khedive congratulating him"
on his
" magnanimity and good sense."
The Khedive's
"womankind . . . were frantic"
over his leniency and a message from the Queen would
"give him courage"
to face them. Queen Victoria's answer was sharp as the swords of her soldiers.
"The Queen cannot possibly send the message of approbation to the Khedive ... as she so highly disapproves of the weakness which actuated it. It is for the British Government, who are solely responsible for this act . . . to send him this message."
She thought the Khedive's womankind showed "a right feeling" in being " frantic. " 6


{121}

1883

THE Prince of Wales had to abandon his hope of Britain and France peacefully dividing the colonial prizes. He had also to suffer from the fickleness of mass popularity, in the spring of 1883, when a new antiroyalist fever in Paris made it "wise" for him to cancel his yearly visit. He was perplexed, and even tempted to think he had been wrong; that Germany, not France, was Britain's natural friend.1 The Queen watched the scene with less confusion. She did not think it incongruous to insist on a strong British army of occupation in Egypt, to greet the occupation of New Guinea, in her name, in April, 1883, and then protest because the French began their conquest of Madagascar. She wrote,2

"Are we to let the French go on taking what they like with impunity? First Tunis and now Madagascar?"

The confusion in the Liberal government and Mr. Gladstone's weak control of almost every colonial situation were matched by the equally confused colonial policy of the French. The only great statesman who

-304-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
  • {102} 262
  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
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  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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