{123}

1882-1884

IN SEPTEMBER, 1882, there had been an interview between Mr. Gladstone and the Queen, on

"most difficult ground. "
He wrote in his diary that
"aided by her beautiful manners"
they
"got over it better than would be expected. "
1 The store of strength from tree-felling at Hawarden was petering out and in January, 1883, the Prime Minister was inclined to take to his bed
"on less provocation than most people. "
2 The failure to keep peace in Ireland, Egypt, Africa, and India, and the mysteries of European policies, were an unnatural burden for even Mr. Gladstone's mighty shoulders. Behind the Queen's "beautiful manners" were hope that he might retire, and anxiety over what he might do next. Early in 1883, when Mr. Gladstone announced another pilgrimage to Midlothian, the Queen wrote, 3 expressing her
"earnest hope"
that he would be
"very guarded in his language."
Immense importance would be attached to
"every word"
he said. Was it not
"rather venturesome"
for him to go to cold Scotland, in cold January, with the opening of Parliament so near?

A doleful letter came back. Mr. Gladstone's doctor had forbidden the journey, so the immediate danger was removed. The Queen wrote again. Mr. Gladstone must be

"really quiet "
and
"not occupy himself at all with affairs, and not write long letters."
" Would he not now, for the sake of his health, accept a Peerage? "
4 Mr. Gladstone refused the honour and marshalled his shattered strength, after five weeks at Cannes, to face the fourth year of his Parliament. Ireland, South Africa, and Egypt were still his heaviest burdens. The Irish brought their war to the centre of affairs by blowing up part of the Local Government Board Office in Whitehall, then a gasworks in Glasgow. They also tried to blow up an aqueduct and dared to plant explosives in the Fleet Street office of The Times. In South Africa, Cetewayo was hatching new plots, but not against the British. The sight of the little old Queen who told him he had been brave, the majesty of the warships in the Solent, and the whirl of spacious London had taught him the meaning of power.

The most terrible, new menace came from the southern provinces of Egypt where the Sudanese would not bow to British authority, so firmly planted in the north. Under the leadership of the Mahdi, a

-310-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
  • {102} 262
  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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