Lord Salisbury was at Hatfield, and late at night his son went to the local telegraph office, to wait for the verdict. Telephones were not used in private houses then; so the great news had to be carried to Hatfield on foot. It came at three o'clock in the morning and the eager young Cecil ran up the hill towards the park gates, waking the villagers with his shouting. He was able to tell his father that the bill had been defeated by thirty votes.


{129}

1886

MR. GLADSTONE had to write 1 to the Queen again, that his cabinet had determined

"it was their duty humbly"
to advise her
"to dissolve the present Parliament."
But he would not accept defeat and during the weeks before the inevitable election, he went back to the scenes of his earlier triumphs, in Midlothian, to catch the voters up in the magic net of his words. On June 28 he spoke in Hengler's Circus and wrote afterwards,
"Few buildings give so noble a presentation of an audience. Once more my voice held out in a marvellous manner. I went in bitterness, in the heat of my spirit, but the hand of the Lord was strong upon me."
This time Mr. Gladstone's fate depended upon voters, who were mostly horrified by the Irish plan, and not upon the divine cooperation in which he was so confident. When the results of the election were declared in July, the opponents of Irish Home Rule in the Commons exceeded its friends by one hundred and ten.

Again the venerable leader went to the Queen with his seals, and with what he thought might be his

" last word with the Sovereign after fifty-five years of political life, and a good quarter of a century's service rendered to her in office."
He wrote:
"The Queen was in good spirits; her manners altogether pleasant. She made me sit at once. Asked after my wife as we began, and sent a kind message to her as we ended. About me personally, I think, her single remark was that I should require some rest. I remember that on a closing audience in 1874 she said she felt sure I might be reckoned upon to support the throne. She did not say anything of the sort to-day. Her mind and opinions have since that day been seriously warped, and I respect her for the scrupulous avoidance of anything which could have seemed to indicate a desire on her part to claim anything in common with me."
2

Queen Victoria could afford to be "altogether pleasant." Eight days

-322-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
  • {102} 262
  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 437

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.