The Queen thought Irving "acted wonderfully" and she waited in the drawing room afterwards, to speak to him. He was "very gentlemanlike," and Ellen Terry was "pleasing and handsome."

The five busy, happy days ended. The Queen went home, "greatly touched" by all the "kindness and affection," which was so different from the alarming forces taking shape in Germany.

The character of the man behind those forces was revealed again in June, 1889, when Queen Victoria hoped to encourage her grandson to good behaviour by making him an Admiral of the British Navy. The Emperor said, in an extraordinary letter 9 of thanks to the British Ambassador in Berlin, that the honour made him

"quite giddy."
"Fancy wearing the same uniform as St. Vincent and Nelson. ... I feel something like Macbeth must have felt when he was suddenly received by the witches with the cry of 'All hail, who are Thane of Glamis and of Cawdor too.'"
There was a postscript to the letter; odd for a proud Emperor addressing the ambassador of another country.
"I beg to be allowed to remark that I do not look upon you as a witch, but more as a good fairy."

The Emperor might have added to his knowledge of Macbeth by turning over one more page and reading, " ... have we eaten on the insane root That takes the reason prisoner?"


{137}

1889-1890

QUEEN VICTORIA was seventy years old at the time when her grandson disappointed her hopes for Germany and began to assume the shape of an enemy. Sometimes she gave in to the weariness of her age, and one day she complained,

"Still in pain, and have to be carried up and down stairs, which is tiresome. "
1 The Queen was grateful next day, when she was "able to walk alone with a stick from room to room." Her valour soon burned up through her tiredness. Eighteen days later the Queen went to London, to her son's garden party. She met many people and talked a great deal, but was punished afterwards by a " dreadful night." Next day she was pleased to sit quietly, writing her letters and reading her papers, in the little revolving teahouse amid the trees at Frogmore. In the afternoon she felt strong enough to walk over to her husband's tomb; but the effort was too much and when she came

-335-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
  • {102} 262
  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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