daughters, "to see that all were doing their bit." Then her own voice would be heard, once she approved of the efforts of the others. 3 When the service was over, the Queen would leave, with her mixed retinue, followed by her daughters. The choir boys who had thus lived face to face with their Sovereign for almost an hour, then hurried through the long passages of the castle, on their way back to the choir school. Sometimes they were allowed to look into the vast kitchen where the Queen's luncheon was being prepared; where spit dogs were still used, as in Tudor times.

The shining faces of the choir boys always melted the heart of the Royal chef. He would say,

"If you will be the Queen's tasters you will be doing a service to your country, young gentlemen."
Then he would give them delicacies from the kitchen and they would be on their way, feeling they had partaken of the grandeur of history; that they were really part of the life of the vast proud castle, which had suffered the alarms of eight hundred years.

The changes in Queen Victoria's time had been many and remarkable. There was still only one bathroom in the castle, for the Queen herself. Others had to wash in big tubs, in their bedrooms. The Queen was able to see the newfangled motor-cars from the castle windows although she would never ride in one herself. And she was able to speak to Lord Salisbury, in London, by telephone. On November 23, 1896, she went into the Red Drawing Room to see the cinematograph pictures that had been taken at Balmoral, seven weeks before. She thought the " so-called animated pictures" "wonderful," the people, their movements and actions, all "as if they were alive. " 4


{151}

1897

QUEEN VICTORIA wrote in her journal, on June 20, 1897,

"This eventful day, 1897, has opened, and I pray God to help and protect me as He has hitherto done during these sixty long eventful years ... God will surely help me on! How well I remember this day sixty years ago, when I was called from my bed by dear Mama to receive the news of my accession!"

In 1887, rulers of Europe had come with their compliments; but the Diamond Jubilee was to be an Empire celebration, a family tribute,

-363-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
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  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
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  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
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  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
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  • {86} 213
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  • {115} 289
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  • {138} 338
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  • {145} 352
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  • {147} 356
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  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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