who placed a bouquet in their grandmother's hands. The Queen, who had been among the first of her generation to like Wagner's music, chose three acts of Lohengrin for the evening celebration and she was "simply enchanted." It was

"the most glorious composition, so poetic, so dramatic, and one might almost say, religious in feeling and full of sadness, pathos, and tenderness."
The opera "produced a great impression" on the Queen.


{153}

1899

WHEN Mr. Balfour was at Osborne in August, 1899, he told the Queen that the last session of Parliament had been

"the most successful and the quietest he ever remembered."
Everything was
"most satisfactory excepting the Transvaal."
1 In May, the 21,684 Uitlanders in the Transvaal had sent a petition to the Queen. They were twenty times more numerous than the Boers, but President Kruger still refused them any voice in the government of the rich mining country. The Queen's secretary wrote her a report: 2

Promises made after the Jameson Raid have never been fulfilled; there is no liberty of the Press; British subjects can be expelled at the will of the President; the Uitlanders ... are overtaxed. ... They are not allowed to meet together, or even to present petitions; the police are entirely composed of Boers, and behave in the most arbitrary and indeed oppressive manner, and are responsible for the murder of one British subject....

The terrible, hidden convulsions of war began. There was no open protest or ultimatum to President Kruger, but troops and munitions were sent to the Cape; and, to prove that the processions of the Jubilee were not empty show, Canada and Australia promised to support the mother country if there was war. July and August were devoted to patience, and preparation, both justified by Lord Wolseley's report, from the War Office, that if war came Britain

"would be obliged to send the largest force that has ever left our shores."
The distance being so great, it would be the
"most serious business"
the War Office
"ever had on hand. "

Germany and France accused Britain of being a great and powerful nation, setting out to crush a minority. Germany pleaded for the "poor Boers" as passionately as England had pleaded for "poor little Denmark

-369-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
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  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
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  • {48} 124
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  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
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  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
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  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
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  • {76} 180
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  • {80} 190
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  • {84} 204
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  • {86} 213
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  • {109} 274
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  • {111} 278
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  • {115} 289
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  • {123} 310
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  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
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  • {147} 356
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  • {149} 360
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  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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