Revolutionary New England, 1691-1776

By James Truslow Adams | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
ATTEMPTS AT COÖPERATION, IMPERIAL AND
COLONIAL

Influence of European Situation -- Dudley as Governor -- Characteristic Feature of His Administration -- Renewed War with French -- Attitude of the Colonies -- Jamaica Expedition -- Ineffectiveness of Colonial Militia -- Attacks on Dudley -- Expeditions against Canada

THAT race for empire, of which I described the beginnings in the preceding volume, had never ceased since it first began, between the, leading powers of the Old World, however the individual power of each might alter. In 1700, the contest entered upon a new and decisive phase, and the death, in that year, of the Spanish monarch Charles the Second was the cause of that of many a New England soldier and frontiersman in the decade and a half that followed. By his will he left the vast and undivided domains of his empire to a grandson of Louis the Fourteenth, the young Philip of Anjou, and in spite of former self-denying treaties Louis accepted the bequest on his behalf. At once the whole international colonial question was brought to a head. It was not merely that the closer union of the two crowns destroyed the European balance of power by the passing under the control of France of the Spanish imperial possessions, including Sicily, Naples, Milan and Flanders. The fateful and faithless acceptance of the legacy for his grandson by the French king signified even more in the union of the world's two greatest colonial empires under the greatest single military power of the day. It seemed the commercial death-blow to England and Holland, the two nations whose very life had come to depend upon their over-seas trade. On the surface it was a question of who was to rule Spain, but fundamentally it was who was to rule the commerce of the world.1 France had grasped at the

____________________
1
J. R. Seeley, Growth of British Policy, ( London, 1895), vol. II, pp. 352f.; Greene, Provincial America, pp. 136ff.; Deschamps, Histoire de la Question coloniale, pp. 164ff.

-60-

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Revolutionary New England, 1691-1776
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface V
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Chapter I Introductory 3
  • Chapter II the Machinery of Empire 18
  • Chapter III the Dawn of the Century 30
  • Chapter IV the Policy of Unified Control 46
  • Chapter V Attempts at CoÖperation, Imperial and Colonial 60
  • Chapter VI the Rising Tide 84
  • Chapter VII Diverging Interests 111
  • Chapter VIII Expanding Energies 138
  • Chapter IX the Great Divide 169
  • Chapter X the Wrong Turning 200
  • Chapter XI the Fate of a Continent 221
  • Chapter XII War and Business 250
  • Chapter XIII the Price of Peace 278
  • Chapter XIV the Insoluble Problem 304
  • Chapter XV Darkening Skies 338
  • Chapter XVI the Issue Defined 369
  • Chapter XVII the Defeat of the Conservatives 406
  • Chapter XVIII Civil War 433
  • Index 453
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