Human Exploitation in the United States

By Norman Thomas | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XV
LITTLE OWNER, WHAT NOW?

Back in the good old days of Calvin Coolidge, Professor Thomas Nixon Carver of Harvard, was perhaps the most illustrious spokesman of those who had our economic problem solved. The slogan was not, "Every man a worker," but, "Every man a capitalist." The solution was not collective ownership of workers through cooperatives or the government, and production for use, but rather collective ownership through corporations, owned by vast numbers of individuals who share in profits according to the amount of their ownership. This solution was the more attractive because it was painless. Supposedly it was taking place before our eyes. Mr. Gardner Means estimated that the number of stockholders appearing on the books of American corporations in 1922, was 13,564,000 and by 1927 it had risen to about I8,ooo,ooo. The conventional propaganda figure was "15,000,000 stockholders." Eminent economists—though not Mr. Means—were guilty of quoting these figures as if there were no duplications and each name meant a different individual stockholder. It was magnificent propaganda. The bankers joined in. The blessed fallacy of averages was invoked to show that the "share of saving of every American man, woman, and child has risen from $74 in 1910 to $237 in 1928." Even as late as 1930 the hallelujah chorus went on. The American Bankers Association through its savings division exulted in the slight increase of savings that year- the next year showed a different picture—and called attention to the fact that the number of deposit accounts

-327-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human Exploitation in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Human Exploitation in the United States *
  • To My Wife *
  • Preface vii
  • Contents *
  • Introduction xiii
  • Chapter I Land and Those Who Live on It i
  • Chapter II Real Estate Vs. Homes 13
  • Chapter III Farming for Exercise 4
  • Chapter IV Men and Trees 72
  • Chapter V Mines and Miners 92
  • Chapter VI New Sources of Physical Energy 119
  • Chapter VII Working for Wages 137
  • Chapter VIII Working Conditions 164
  • Chapter IX Unemployment 183
  • Chapter X Women in Industry 215
  • Chapter XI Exploiting Our Children 231
  • Chapter XII the Negro 258
  • Chapter XIII the Labor Struggle 284
  • Chapter XIV the Consumer Pays 304
  • Chapter XV Little Owner, What Now? 327
  • Chapter XVI the Government as Exploiter 357
  • Chapter XVII in Conclusion 374
  • Bibliography 391
  • Index 399
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 402

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.