The Yemassee

By William Gilmore Simms; Alexander Cowie | Go to book overview
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CHAPTER VIII

"The nations meet in league a solemn league,
This is their voice this their united pledge,
For all adventure."

SANUTEE turned away from the spot whence Harrison had departed, and was about to retire, when, not finding himself followed by Ishiagaska, and perceiving the approach of the sailor, his late opponent, and not knowing what to expect, whether peace or war, he again turned, facing the two, and lifting his bow, and setting his arrow, he prepared himself for a renewal of the strife. But the voice of the sailor and of Ishiagaska, at the same moment, reached his ears in language of conciliation; and, resting himself slightly against a tree, foregoing none of his precautions, however, with a cold indifference he awaited their approach. The seaman addressed him with all his usual bluntness, but with a manner now very considerably changed from what it was at their first encounter. He apologized for his violence, and for having slain the dog. Had he known to whom it belonged, so he assured the chief, he had not been so hasty in despatching it; and, as some small amends, he begged the Indian to do with the venison as he thought proper, for it was now his own. During the utterance of this uncouth apology, mixed up as it was with numberless oaths, Sanutee looked on and listened with contemptuous indifference. When it was done, he simply replied

" It is well but the white man will keep the meat: it is not for Sanutee."

" Come, come, don't be ill-favoured now, old warrior. What's done can't be undone, and more ado is too much to do. I'm sure I'm sorry enough I killed the dog, but how was I to know he belonged to you? "

The sailor might have gone on for some time after this fashion, had not Ishiagaska, seeing that the reference to his dog only the more provoked the ire of the chief, interposed by an address to the sailor, which more readily commanded Sanutee's consideration.

" The master of the big canoe is he not the chief that comes from St. Augustine? Ishiagaska has looked upon the white chiefin the great lodge of his Spanish brother."

-65-

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