The Yemassee

By William Gilmore Simms; Alexander Cowie | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XV

" Thou shalt disgorge thy prey, give up thy spoil,
And yield thee prisoner. The time is short,
Make thy speech fitting."

BEFORE resuming with these parties, let us retire to the green wood with Harrison and the trader. We have heard the merry horn of his comrades responding freely to that of the former.

"You shall see them,"
said he to Granger —
" brave fellows and true, and sufficient for my purpose. I can rely upon Grimstead, the smith, and his brother, certainly, for I left them but a couple of hours ago at the smithy. Theirs was the first answer we heard. I know not who comes the second, but I look for Wat Grayson from that quarter, and sure enough, he is here. Ha! Grayson, you are true and in time, as usual. I give you welcome, for I want your arm."

" And at your service, captain, to strike deer or enemy, for fight or labour. Ha! Granger — but you have forgotten my knife, which I've sorely wanted."

"It is here, at the Block House, ready for you."

" Good! Well, captain, what's the service now? I'm ready, you see, and glad that you feel able to count so free upon Wat Grayson."

" You shall soon see, Grayson. I wait for but a few more of the boys, to show you the work before us; and in order not to waste more time, wind your horn, and let the men come freely."

The horn was wound again, and but a few seconds had elapsed when a distant reply from two other quarters acknowledged the summons. In a few moments the sturdy blacksmith, Grimstead, followed by his younger brother, penetrated the little area, which was the usual place of assemblage. A moment after, a bustling little body, known at Dr. Nichols, the only medical man in that region, also entered the ring, mounted upon a little ambling pony, or tacky from the marsh — a sturdy little animal in much use, though of repute infinitely below its merits.

" Ha! doctor — our worthy Esculapius — how fares it? You come in time, for we look to have some bones for your setting before long,"
exclaimed Harrison, addressing him.

-118-

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The Yemassee
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • American Fiction Series *
  • The Yemassee *
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A Simms Chronology xxxvi
  • Selected Bibliography xxxvii
  • The Yemassee Uprising xlii
  • Note on the Text *
  • To Professor Samuel Henry Dickson, M.D., of South Carolina 3
  • Chapter I 9
  • Chapter II 15
  • Chapter III 21
  • Chapter IV 28
  • Chapter V 34
  • Chapter VI 43
  • Chapter VII 51
  • Chapter VIII 65
  • Chapter IX 74
  • Chapter X 81
  • Chapter XI 91
  • Chapter XII 98
  • Chapter XIII 105
  • Chapter XIV 113
  • Chapter XV 118
  • Chapter XVI 123
  • Chapter XVII 133
  • Chapter XVIII 139
  • Chapter XIX 146
  • Chapter XX 151
  • Chapter XXI 159
  • Chapter XXII 165
  • Chapter XXIII 173
  • Chapter XXIV 182
  • Chapter XXV 188
  • Chapter XXVI 201
  • Chapter XXVII 210
  • Chapter XXVIII 215
  • Chapter XXIX 222
  • Chapter XXX 229
  • Chapter XXXI 235
  • Chapter XXXII 243
  • Chapter XXXIII 249
  • Chapter XXXIV 255
  • Chapter XXXV 265
  • Chapter XXXVI 271
  • Chapter XXXVII 276
  • Chapter XXXVIII 283
  • Chapter Xxxix 295
  • Chapter XL 300
  • Chapter XLI 307
  • Chapter XLII 314
  • Chapter XLIII 322
  • Chapter XLIV 329
  • Chapter XLV 336
  • Chapter XLVI 345
  • Chapter XLVII 355
  • Chapter XLVIII 363
  • Chapter Xlix 375
  • Chapter L 382
  • Chapter LI 389
  • Chapter LII 396
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