The Yemassee

By William Gilmore Simms; Alexander Cowie | Go to book overview

CHAPTER L

" Another stroke for triumph. It goes well,
The foe gives back — he yields. Another hour
Beholds us on his neck."

HARRISON thus blessed with happiness, appropriated but little time, however, to its enjoyment. His mind was of that active sort, that even the sweets of love were to be enjoyed by him as a stimulant, rather than a clog to exertion. Conveying the little family to a recess in the woods, and out of sight of the craft of the pirate, he immediately proceeded — having first led the foresters aside — to explain his further desires to them in reference to their common duties.

" Joy, my brave fellows, and thanks to you, for this last night's good service. You have done well, and risked yourselves nobly. Grayson, give me your hand — you are a good soldier. Where's your brother? "

" Here! " was the single word of response spoken from the background by the lips of Hugh Grayson. The tone of the monosyllable was melancholy, but not sullen. Harrison advanced to him, and extended his hand.

" Master Grayson, to you we owe most of our safety to-day. But for you, the sun would have found few of us with a scalp on. Your activity in bringing up the men has saved us; for, though otherwise safe enough, the firing of the Block House must have been fatal to all within. For myself, I may freely acknowledge, my life, at this moment, is due to your timely appearance. Your command, too, was excellently managed for so young a soldier. Accept my thanks, sir, in behalf of the country not less than of myself. I shall speak to you again on this subject, and in regard to other services in which your aid will be required, after a while."

The youth looked upon Harrison with a degree of surprise, which prevented him from making any adequate answer. Whence came that air of conscious superiority in the speaker — that tone of command — of a power unquestionable, and held as if born with it in his possession? The manner of Harrison had all the ease and loftiness of a prince; and, scarcely less than the crowd around him,

-382-

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The Yemassee
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • American Fiction Series *
  • The Yemassee *
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A Simms Chronology xxxvi
  • Selected Bibliography xxxvii
  • The Yemassee Uprising xlii
  • Note on the Text *
  • To Professor Samuel Henry Dickson, M.D., of South Carolina 3
  • Chapter I 9
  • Chapter II 15
  • Chapter III 21
  • Chapter IV 28
  • Chapter V 34
  • Chapter VI 43
  • Chapter VII 51
  • Chapter VIII 65
  • Chapter IX 74
  • Chapter X 81
  • Chapter XI 91
  • Chapter XII 98
  • Chapter XIII 105
  • Chapter XIV 113
  • Chapter XV 118
  • Chapter XVI 123
  • Chapter XVII 133
  • Chapter XVIII 139
  • Chapter XIX 146
  • Chapter XX 151
  • Chapter XXI 159
  • Chapter XXII 165
  • Chapter XXIII 173
  • Chapter XXIV 182
  • Chapter XXV 188
  • Chapter XXVI 201
  • Chapter XXVII 210
  • Chapter XXVIII 215
  • Chapter XXIX 222
  • Chapter XXX 229
  • Chapter XXXI 235
  • Chapter XXXII 243
  • Chapter XXXIII 249
  • Chapter XXXIV 255
  • Chapter XXXV 265
  • Chapter XXXVI 271
  • Chapter XXXVII 276
  • Chapter XXXVIII 283
  • Chapter Xxxix 295
  • Chapter XL 300
  • Chapter XLI 307
  • Chapter XLII 314
  • Chapter XLIII 322
  • Chapter XLIV 329
  • Chapter XLV 336
  • Chapter XLVI 345
  • Chapter XLVII 355
  • Chapter XLVIII 363
  • Chapter Xlix 375
  • Chapter L 382
  • Chapter LI 389
  • Chapter LII 396
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