Laws Harsh as Tigers: Chinese Immigrants and the Shaping of Modern Immigration Law

By Lucy E. Salyer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Bureaucratic Tyranny THE BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION AND ITS CRITICS

Given the outcome in Ju Toy, it is not surprising that Commissioner General of Immigration Frank P. Sargent expressed great satisfaction in his annual report for 1905 with the agency's administration of Chinese exclusion. "In no [other] branch of its widespread activities," crowed Sargent, has the bureau "so thoroughly succeeded in carrying into effective operation the purpose of the laws." Yet he devoted the remainder of his report on Chinese exclusion to defending the bureau against severe criticisms mounted by "a large and somewhat vociferous element" who opposed the policy and denounced officials responsible for its enforcement. 1 Indeed, the bureau had only a few days to enjoy its victory in Ju Toy before Chinese launched a dramatic boycott of American goods, largely in protest against the Bureau of Immigration's treatment of them. Any hope that the bureau had that Ju Toy would end the struggle over Chinese exclusion was soon dashed by the boycott.

Ironically, the agency's success in the litigation leading up to Ju Toy provided the very impetus for new, broad-based challenges to its authority. The bureau had emerged in 1905 as an agency with unusual power over both aliens and alleged citizens. In the words of one critic, the Supreme Court had "emancipated" the Bureau of Immigration from the federal courts and, in its sanctioning of summary administrative methods, had loosened the hold of constitutional and judicial norms. Immediately preceding Ju Toy, well-publicized cases involving both Chinese and non-Chinese immigrants had generated concern about the possible abuses of ad

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Laws Harsh as Tigers: Chinese Immigrants and the Shaping of Modern Immigration Law
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 338

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.