Meaning and Truth: Essential Readings in Modern Semantics

By Jay L. Garfield; Murray Kiteley | Go to book overview

JAY L. GARFIELD & HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE, AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS

MURRAY KITELEY SMITH COLLEGE, NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS


MEANING AND TRUTH: ESSENTIAL READINGS IN MODERN SEMANTICS

PARAGON ISSUE IN PHILOSOPHY

PARAGON HOUSE NEW YORK 1991

-vii-

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Meaning and Truth: Essential Readings in Modern Semantics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Paragon Issues in Philosophy iii
  • Title Page vii
  • Contents xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Preface xv
  • General Introduction xix
  • Part One - The Beginnings 1
  • Introduction 3
  • Of Names and Propositions 8
  • On Sense and Nominatum 35
  • The Semantic Conception of Truth and the Foundations of Semantics 53
  • On Denoting 87
  • Part Two - On Descriptions 101
  • Introduction 103
  • On Referring 108
  • Mr. Strawson on Referring 130
  • Meaning and Necessity 136
  • Reference and Definite Descriptions 144
  • Speaker's Reference and Semantic Reference 162
  • Presupposition and Two-Dimensional Logic 189
  • Dthat 212
  • On the Logic of Demonstratives 234
  • Part Three - On Tarski 249
  • Introduction 251
  • Donald Davidson Truth and Meaning 254
  • Tarski's Theory of Truth 271
  • Physicalism and Primitive Denotation: Field on Tarski 297
  • Part Four - Intensionality 317
  • Introduction 319
  • Quantifiers and Propositional Attitudes 323
  • On Saying That 334
  • An Overview of Montague Semantics 348
  • Subjectivity's Bailiwick: And the Person of Its Bailiff 372
  • Part Five - The Structure of Meaning 397
  • Introduction 399
  • Two Types of Quantifiers 403
  • A Logical Theory of Verb-Phrase Deletion 431
  • Structured Meanings 446
  • Structural Ambiguity 453
  • Part Six - Possible Worlds 461
  • Introduction 463
  • Propositions 467
  • Possible Worlds 478
  • Actualism and Possible Worlds 485
  • The Trouble with Possible Worlds 503
  • Part Seven - Pragmatics 541
  • Introduction 543
  • On Specificity 546
  • Metaphorese 582
  • Metaphorical Assertions 599
  • The Problem of the Essential Indexical 613
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