The Beginnings of Quakerism

By William C. Braithwaite | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
THE WIDER OUTLOOK

Sound, sound abroad, you faithful servants of the Lord, and witnesses in His name, . . . and prophets of the Highest, and angels of the Lord! Sound ye all abroad in the world, to the awakening and raising of the dead, that they may be awakened, and raised up out of the grave, to hear the voice that is living. For the dead have long heard the dead, and the blind have long wandered among the blind, and the deaf amongst the deaf. Therefore sound, sound ye servants and prophets and angels of the Lord, ye trumpets of the Lord, that you may awaken the dead, and awaken them that be asleep in their graves of sin, death and hell, and sepulchres and sea and earth, and who lie in the tombs. Sound, sound abroad, ye trumpets, and raise up the dead, that the dead may hear the voice of the Son of God, the voice of the second Adam that never fell; the voice of the Light, and the voice of the Life; the voice of the Power, and the voice of the Truth; the voice of the Righteous, and the voice of the Just. Sound, sound the pleasant and melodious sound; sound, sound ye the trumpets, the melodious sound abroad, that all the deaf ears may be opened to hear the pleasant sound of the trumpet to judgment and life, to condemnation and light.-- "GEO. Fox to Friends in the Ministry", 1669 Journ. ii.111).

WE have described the first preaching of the Quaker message throughout England. Before continuing the main narrative, the beginnings of work in Wales, Ireland, and Scotland must be sketched, so that we may gain a better understanding of the immense initial energy of the new movement, and of its universal mission.

We have already recorded Morgan Lloyd's inquiries after Fox in 1653, and Lawson and Hubberthorne's visit to Wrexham. John ap John, one of Lloyd's messengers, became the centre of the first Quaker group in North Wales, and the first sufferer in the Principality, the offence being that he asked the minister at Swansea if he were a minister of Christ.1 This was in October 1655,

____________________
1
Besse sufferings, i. 735 For Jno. ap John see J.F.H.S. Supplmt. No. 6.

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