The Leasing of Federal Lands for Fossil Fuels Production

By Stephen L. McDonald | Go to book overview

2 The Legal Basis of Leasing Practice

To begin, we will review the statutes and regulations governing the leasing of federal lands. Such a review will indicate not only the legal foundations but also the nature of actual practice. Incidentally, it will also provide the basis for later indicating whether changes in the law would be required to authorize certain changes in practice that have been or may be suggested. We will make no attempt in this review to cover every detail of law; rather, our purpose will be to bring out those major features which have a bearing on the largely economic analysis that constitutes the bulk of this study.

The presentation is organized by statutes, but at appropriate points we will provide the content of major amplifying regulations. We will ignore those regulations that merely repeat statutory provisions, or those that concern administrative details of no particular relevance to our study. Also, at this time we will not discuss operating regulations governing lessees; these will be taken up at a later point in the context of efficiency, conservation, and related matters.


THE MINERAL LEASING ACT OF 1920, AS AMENDED

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS

The Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 is the basic law governing the leasing of onshore public lands (as distinguished from the outer continental shelf, covered by another statute).1 The act provides that

. . . Deposits of coal, phosphate, sodium, potassium, oil, oil shale, native asphalt, solid and semisolid bitumen, and bituminous rock, or gas,

____________________
1
30 U.S.C. 181-287.

-6-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Leasing of Federal Lands for Fossil Fuels Production
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 194

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.