The Politics of Disappointment: American Elections, 1976-94

By Wilson Carey McWilliams | Go to book overview

6
Thinking about Tomorrow Worriedly:
The Election of 1992

And all the unsettled humours of the land . . . Have sold their fortunes at their native homes, Bearing their birthrights proudly on their backs, To make a hazard of new fortunes here.

-- The Life and Death of King John ( II, i)

Half a millennium ago, Columbus, unwitting, landed in a new world, and Americans in 1992 suspected that, like him, they had arrived at some unexpected place, full of unfamiliar shadows.* In the election, most Americans allowed themselves to be drawn by hope, but they went wistfully, driven by worries and without much confidence, convinced that they had more to fear than fear itself.

Change was in the air: for the first time in more than half a century, a presidential election was not framed by war, present or rumored; voters were restless; new concerns and constituencies made themselves felt; and the victorious Democrats pro

____________________
*
A century earlier, prophetically, Henry Adams saw the Amencan people "wandering in a wilderness more sandy than ... Sinai," and in 1893, the Columbian Exposition seemingly "asked ... for the first time ... whether the American people knew where they were driving." Henry Adams, The Education of Henry Adams, ed. Ernest Samuels ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1974), 329, 343. But few Americans, back then, shared the vision.

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Politics of Disappointment: American Elections, 1976-94
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 12
  • 2 - South Wind, Warning: The Election of 1976 15
  • Notes 34
  • 3 - Presidential Leadership and Changing Parties: The Election of 1980 37
  • Notes 60
  • 4 - Old Virtues, New Magic: The Election of 1984 63
  • Notes 97
  • 5 - Enchantment's Ending: The Election of 1988 101
  • Notes 136
  • 6 - Thinking About Tomorrow Worriedly: The Election of 1992 143
  • Notes 173
  • 7 - Slouching Toward the Millennium: The Election of 1994 183
  • Notes 200
  • Index 203
  • About the Author 211
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 211

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.