The College Influence on Student Character: An Exploratory Study in Selected Colleges and Universities Made for the Committee for the Study of Character Development in Education

By Edward D. Eddy Jr.; Mary Louise Parkhurst et al. | Go to book overview

2. The Level of Expectancy

To my mind college ought to be a really satisfying experience. When we graduate from this old place, we should be proud of our accomplishments, of what we've learned and the way we've performed. Right now, as a senior, I'll have to admit that my four years on this campus have been pretty uneven. Some of the people around here have pushed me so hard that I was amazed I had the stuff in me to respond. Others have engaged in a hit- and-run operation; I'm pretty disgusted with both of us, as I look back on it.

Let me put it this way: where I found weakness, I took ad- vantage of it; but where I found strength, I respected it. If I'm allowed ever to slip by, I'll do it every time. But if I'm really expected to perform. I'll come through or go down fighting.

THE STUDENT was attempting to be honest. His remark oc- curred in a casual conversation in a dormitory lounge late one evening. We were near the end of our tour of twenty Ameri- can colleges and universities. But to us his words were not new. Similar testimonies, including some more emphatic and discour- aged, had been heard from his counterparts wherever we traveled. It was talk of this kind, listened to early in our study and lasting until the final college had been visited, which led us to identify the implicit as well as the explicit level of expectancy as a highly important determinant of what happens to the college student. Our observations were reinforced by the frequent student reac- tion echoed by another who concluded, "Oh sure, I've received good marks and all that, but I've never really had to work very hard. Now that it's almost over I feel as though I've been cheat- ing myself, or maybe I've been cheated. I've never really been pushed."

If this level of expectancy is so important, where and how does it begin to operate? We found, as one might expect, that it is cer-

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The College Influence on Student Character: An Exploratory Study in Selected Colleges and Universities Made for the Committee for the Study of Character Development in Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 190

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.