Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse, 1625-1660

By Peter Davidson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The editor is greatly indebted to the following individuals and institutions for permission to include, and help in preparing, poems in their possession: the Library of the University of Aberdeen; the British Library; the Bodleian Library, Oxford; the Cambridge University Library (to all the staff of the Rare Books Room, and most particularly to Brian Jenkins and Thyrsa Costello-Cortes); the National Library of Scotland, particularly the music department and Dr Ruzena Wood; the libraries of St John's College, Cambridge, and its former Librarian, Guy Lee; the Library of Corpus Christi College, Oxford; the Taylorean Institution in Oxford; Houghton Library, Harvard; The James Marshall and Marie-Louise Osborn Collection, Beinecke Library, Yale University, particularly its Curator, Stephen Parks; the library of Trinity College, Cambridge; Derby Central Library; the Royal Library, The Hague; The University Library, Leiden; the Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino.

I have particular cause to thank those in whose works I first found the Celtic texts included in this volume: the Scottish Gaelic Texts Society, Seán Ó Tuama and Thomas Kinsella and Dolmen Press. It should perhaps be emphasized that exigencies of presentation have compelled the revision of most texts given in this book from all the Celtic languages.

A project of this scope is of its nature beyond what an author working alone can afford: I am therefore particularly grateful to the following bodies for research and grant support. St Edmund's College, Cambridge, provided a secure base from which to undertake the first researches. The following have all made a tangible contribution: the Department of English and Comparative Literature in the University of Warwick, particularly Michael Edwards; Warwick Humanities Research Centre, particularly Peter Mack; the Research and Innovations staff of the University of Warwick, particularly Philip Harvey. I am abidingly grateful for the humane and imaginative backing of the Harold Hyams Wingate Foundation, particularly its secretary, Jane Reid, to whom I am also personally indebted for moral support which has extended far beyond any call of duty.

It is only just to record a debt to the editors of The Penguin Book of Renaissance Verse: although this book had almost reached its final form when their work was published (and although this book is very different in its scope and intentions), David Norbrook and H. R. Woudhuysen encouraged it enormously by example: the generosity of their selection and incisiveness of their editing reassured me that I was not being unduly catholic as regards the former or obsessive as regards the latter. I have, as the acute reader will observe, found virtually no point of difference on text or annotation in those areas where our selections overlap, but have, on the other hand, not been unduly inhibited from including a certain number of the same texts, feeling that they speak differently in such a different context, different publisher, different

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