Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse, 1625-1660

By Peter Davidson | Go to book overview
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APPENDIX 1
INDEX OF CLASSICAL AND
BIBLICAL NAMES
Abigail Old Testament. Devoted wife of Nabal who saved him from King David, who admired her courage and beauty, and later married her himself ( 1 Samuel 25:39). (127)
Absalom Old Testament. David's beloved son Absalom rebelled against him. He had remarkably long, thick hair, and died when his hair became entangled in the branches of an oak as he rode, and his mule went out from under him, leaving him hanging helplessly. Joab, a lieutenant of King David, then killed him with three spears ( 2 Samuel 18). (287)
Achilles Greek myth. The greatest of the warriors on the Greek side at the Trojan War, he was the son of Peleus and Thetis (qv). Thetis attempted to make him invulnerable by plunging him in the Styx (qv), a river of the Underworld, but his heel, which she was holding, escaped contact with the water, and so became his vulnerable spot. He was eventually wounded in the heel by Paris, and died of it. (287)
Acteon Greek myth. Actaeon was a young huntsman who spied on the goddess Diana bathing, was turned into a stag, and so pursued and killed by his own hounds (see Ichnobates and Melampus). (224)
Adam Old Testament. The first man, father of all mankind, created by God to live innnocence in the garden of Eden; expelled with his wife Eve after disobeying God: tempted herself by the Serpent, Eve persuaded Adam to eat the fruit of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil (trad. an apple), they become ashamed of their nakedness and covered themselves with fig leaves (the 'Breeches Bible' translates this as making themselves breeches of fig leaves); after this Fall, Adam is forced to work the land to survive, and his wife is punished with the pains of childbirth ( Genesis). (146, 306, 310)
Aegyptian Queene see Cleopatra
Aeneas The hero of Virgil's Aeneid. He was a Trojan prince, the son of Venus and Anchises. When Troy was destroyed, he managed to save his father, his son Ascanius, and his household gods, though he lost his wife Creusa as they left the city. Leaving Troy with a fleet of ships, he was kindly received by Dido, Queen of Carthage, who fell in love with him. After extensive adventures, he reached Italy, and established himself, after a series of battles with the inhabitants, on the banks of the Tiber. He is thus the founder of the Roman people. Virgil often attaches the epithet pius, 'faithful', to him. (203)
Aeolian Hunter see Orion
Aeolian Maid The ancient Greek poetess, Sappho of Lesbos, flourishing in the fifth century BC (Lesbos is one of the Aeolian isles, named for Aeolus, god of the winds). (256)
Aeolian Tugge/ Aeolian Breath The blast of winter winds. (222)
Aeolus Classical: god who was guardian of winds and storms. Has an important role in the Aeneid, Book 1. (213, 337)
Aetna Mount Etna: Sicilian volcano whose eruptions were said to be the anger of the giant Briaraeus, buried beneath. Etna is high enough to be snowy, and the close juxtaposition of

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