The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and Other Stories

By Jack London; Earle Labor et al. | Go to book overview

A CHRONOLOGY OF JACK LONDON
1876 Born 12 January in San Francisco; named John Griffith
Chancy, Jack is the son of Flora Wellman and her common-
law husband, William Henry Chancy. On 7 September Flora
marries John London; Jack is given London's surname.
1878 London move to Oakland, where John London runs a
grocery store and sells produce wholesale to local markets.
1881 John London's grocery business fails, and the family moves
to a farm in Alameda.
1882 Begins grade school in Alameda; the Londons move to a
seventy-five-acre ranch in San Mateo County.
1884 The Londons move to a small ranch in the Livermore Valley,
where John London unsuccessfully attempts to raise chickens.
1886 The Londons return to Oakland, where Flora runs a
boarding house. Jack works as a newspaper delivery boy, on
an ice wagon, and in a bowling alley. He becomes a voracious
reader, using the Oakland Public Library extensively.
1891 Graduates from Cole Grammar School (eighth grade). He
takes a job at a cannery. Months later, with a borrowed $300
he buys the sloop Razzle-Dazzle and becomes an oyster pirate
on San Francisco Bay.
1892 Serves as a deputy Patrolman for the California Fish Patrol in
Benicia.
1893 Enlist as an able-bodied seaman aboard the Sophia Sutherland, a
sealing schooner, for an eight-month voyage to Hawaii, the
Bonin Islands, Japan, and the Bering Sea. Upon his return,
works in a jute mill for 10 cents an hour. His article "Story of
a Typhoon Off the Coast of Japan" wins first prize in a
contest for young writers sponsored by the San Francisco
Morning
call.
1894 Early in the year Jack works as a coal heaver at the power
plant of the San Oakland, San Leandro, and Haywards Electric
Railway. In April he joins Kelly's Army, the western branch
of Coxey's Industrial Army of the Unemployed, which is
marching on Washington to protest economic conditions.

-xxvii-

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The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and Other Stories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Note on the Text xxiii
  • Select Bibliography xxvi
  • A Chronology of Jack London xxvii
  • Contents 3
  • I - Into the Primitive 5
  • II - The Law of Club and Fang 15
  • III - The Dominant Primordial Beast 24
  • IV - Who Has Won to Mastership 37
  • V - The Toil of Trace and Trail 46
  • VI - For the Love of a Man 60
  • VII - The Sounding of the Call 73
  • Contents 91
  • Part One - The Wild 93
  • I - The Trail of the Meat 93
  • II - The She-Wolf 101
  • III - The Hunger Cry 110
  • Part Two - Born of the Wild 120
  • I - The Battle of the Fangs 120
  • II - The Lair 130
  • III - The Gray Cub 138
  • IV - The Wall of the World 143
  • V - The Law of Meat 153
  • Part Three - The Gods of the Wild 159
  • The Makers of Fire 159
  • II - The Bondage 170
  • III - The Outcast 178
  • IV - The Trail of the Gods 183
  • V - The Covenant 188
  • VI - The Famine 196
  • Part Four - The Superior Gods 204
  • I - The Enemy of His Kind 204
  • II - The Mad God 213
  • III - The Reign of Hate 221
  • IV - The Clinging Death 226
  • V - The Indomitable 237
  • VI - The Love-Master 243
  • Part Five - The Tame 256
  • I - The Long 256
  • II - The Southland 261
  • III - The God''s Domain 268
  • IV - The Call of Kind 278
  • V - The Sleeping Wolf 284
  • BÂtard 293
  • Moon-Face 309
  • Brown Wolf 315
  • That Spot 331
  • To Build a Fire 341
  • Explanatory Notes 358
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