Hidden Futures: Death and Immortality in Ancient Egypt, Anatolia, the Classical, Biblical and Arabic-Islamic World

By J. M. Bremer; Theo P.J. Van Den Hout et al. | Go to book overview

Resurrection, Revelation and Reason Husayn Al-Jisr (d. 1909) and Islamic Eschatology

Rudolph Peters

When, during the second half of the nineteenth century, members of the intellectual elite in the Islamic world became familiar with the findings of modern science, men of religion began to tackle the problem of how to relate these findings to the religious truths founded on revelation. The Indian Muslim Sayyid Abroad Khan ( 1817-1898) was the first one to occupy himself with this problem. He advocated a form of Islam that was in agreement with the modern natural sciences and that had assimilated many ideas and values that were current in the West at that time.1 In the Middle East, the Egyptian reformer Muhammad ˓Abduh ( 1849-1905) worked in the same vein. He intended to interpret Islam in such a manner that it would not be an obstacle to modernization. Like Sayyid Ahmad Khan he posited that there could be no contradiction between revelation and nature. He expressed this notion as follows: "God has sent down two books: one created, which is nature, and one revealed, which is the Kur˒ān.2 These books cannot contradict one another. If there is an apparent contradiction, then the Koran must be interpreted metaphorically (ta˒wīl) so as to make it agree with the findings of natural science."3

In this intellectual tradition the Syrian scholar Husayn al-Jisr ( 1845- 1909)4 had his place. Although he is now almost forgotten, he enjoyed great popularity during his lifetime and for some time after his death.5 One of the reasons for his popularity was that in his writings he dealt with the findings of modern science. In this essay I will examine why and to what extent he made use of natural phenomena and rational explanations in his theological discourse, and I

____________________
1
On Sayyid Ahmad Khan, see: C. W. Troll, Sayyid Ahmad Khan: A Reinterpretation of Muslim Theology ( New Delhi, Vikas Publishing House 1978); J. M.S. Baljon, The Reforms and Religious Ideas of Sir Sayyid Ahmad Khan, 3rd rev. ed. ( Lahore, Ashraf Press 1964).
2
al-Manār, vii, 292, as translated and quoted by C. C. Adams, Islam and Modernism in Egypt ( New York 1933), 136.
3
Adams, Islam and Modernism, 127-143.
4
The data about his life are based on Johannes Ebert, Religion und Reform in der arabischen Provinz: Husayn al-Gisr al-Tarābulusi (1845-1909). Ein islamischer Gelehrter zwischen Tradition und Reform, Heidelberger Orientalistische Studien 18 ( Frankfurt a.M., Peter Lang 1991).
5
As late as in the 1940s, some of his books were popular in Indonesia. See Tāhir al-Djazā˒iri, De edelgesteenten der geloofsleer. Uit bet Ar. vert. en van een inl. en aant. voorzien door G.F. Pijper ( Leiden, Brill 1948) XIV-XV.

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hidden Futures: Death and Immortality in Ancient Egypt, Anatolia, the Classical, Biblical and Arabic-Islamic World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 256

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.