Music Matters: A New Philosophy of Music Education

By David J. Elliott | Go to book overview

Notes

1. Philosophy and Music Education
1.
Bennett Reimer, Developing the Experience of Music, 2d ed., ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1985), p. 200.
2.
Although this book acknowledges the kinds of music teaching and learning that take place in nonformal (community and other "non-school") settings and in informal (or incidental) ways, my focus here is on educational principles and procedures that are deliberately designed and formally instituted in school settings to enable and promote musical understanding. As described in the main text, the situations involving Clara Nette, Tim Pani, and Sara Band are examples of formal music education. The other two situations are examples of nonformal music education.
3.
As Chapter 2 explains, James Mursell played a major role in constructing the foundations of music education as aesthetic education during the 1930s and '40s. Charles Leon- hard built on Mursell work, beginning with his seminal article, "Music Education-- Aesthetic Education," Education 74, no. 1 ( September 1953):23-26. For Leonhard's later reflections on aesthetic education, see his A Realistic Rationale for Teaching Music ( Reston, Va.: Music Educators National Conference, 1985), p. 7.
4.
For critical discussions of the MEAE philosophy, see: David J. Elliott, "Music Education as Aesthetic Education: A Critical Inquiry," The Quarterly Journal of Music Teaching and Learning 2, no. 3 ( Fall 1991): 48-66; Wayne Bowman, "An Essay Review of Bennett Reimer's A Philosophy of Music Education," The Quarterly Journal of Music Teaching and Learning 2, no. 3 ( Fall 1991):76-87; Estelle Jorgensen, "On Philosophical Method," in Handbook of Research on Music Teaching and Learning, ed. Richard Colwell ( New York: Schirmer Books, 1992), pp. 91-101.
5.
Aristotle, Politics ( 1339a15), trans. Jonathan Barnes, ed. Stephen Everson ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988), p. 189.
6.
Bennett Reimer, A Philosophy of Music Education, 2d ed. ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1989), p. 3. Similar senses appear in Charles Leonhard and Robert W. House, Foundations and Principles of Music Education ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1959), pp. 71- 72, and Harold F. Abeles, Charles R. Hoffer, and Robert H. Klotman, Foundations of Music Education ( New York: Schirmer Books, 1984), p. 33.
7.
John Passmore, "Philosophy," in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, ed. Paul Edwards ( New York: Macmillan, 1967), vol. 6, p. 216.
9.
Wayne Bowman, "Philosophy, Criticism, and Music Education: Some Tentative Steps Down a Less Travelled Road," Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, no. 114 ( Fall 1992):4.

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