The First Commentary on Mark: An Annotated Translation

By Michael Cahill | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9

And so it continues with the thirteenth miracle.

After six days he was transfigured on a high mountain in the presence of his disciples (cf. Mark 9:1), so that they would not fear the scandals of the cross, since they had seen with their own eyes the glory of the future resurrection.

And they kept the matter to themselves, discussing what it should mean--"when he shall be risen from the dead" ( Mark 9:9).

Mark is the only one to give this. When death will have been swallowed up in victory,1the former things will be forgotten, and will not come to mind;2 when the Lord will take away the filth of the daughter of Sion,3 wiping away every tear from all the faces of the saints.4

____________________
1
Cf. 1 Cor 15:54.
2
Is 65:17; Cf. Luke 24:38.
3
Cf. Is 4:44.
4
Cf. Is 25:8; Rev 7:17; 2:14. He suggests a meaning for this text, proper to Mark, by listing other texts of an eschatological type, expressing final triumph, and lasting joy and happiness.

-73-

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The First Commentary on Mark: An Annotated Translation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Note: xiv
  • Introduction 3
  • Prologue 19
  • Chapter I 25
  • Chapter 2 41
  • Chapter 3 43
  • Chapter 4 49
  • Chapter 5 55
  • Chapter 6 59
  • Chapter 7 63
  • Chapter 8 69
  • Chapter 9 73
  • Chapter 10 79
  • Chapter 11 83
  • Chapter 12 89
  • Chapter 13 95
  • Chapter 14 99
  • Chapter 15 115
  • Chapter 16 127
  • Epilogue 133
  • Appendix an Interpolated Homily 135
  • Bibliography 139
  • Index of Biblical Texts 147
  • Select Index to Annotations 153
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