Slavery, Law, and Politics: The Dred Scott Case in Historical Perspective

By Don E. Fehrenbacher | Go to book overview

Index
Ableman v. Booth, 241
Abolitionism and abolitionists, 17, 24, 56-57, 58, 67
Adams, John Quincy, 18-19, 53
African Colonization Society, 55
African slave trade. See Slave trade, foreign
Alabama: contingent secession movement in ( 1858), 255
American Bar Association Journal, 305, 306-307
American Insurance Company v. Canter, 69, 173, 203-204
American party. See Know- Nothings
Amistad, slave ship, 19
Anthony, Susan B., 236
Anti-Nebraska movement, 90, 151. See also Republican party
Antislavery. origins of, 8-9, as sentiment and interest, 15, 90. See also Abolitionism and abolitionists; Republican party; Wilmot Proviso
Arkansas: slave law of, 16; expels free Negroes, 237
Arkansas Territory: and Missouri controversy, 49-51; conceded to slavery, 55
Articles of Confederation: and slavery, 9; on citizenship, 34, 35, 188, 224; and western land cessions, 42-43; Taney on, 195, 198, 202-203
Augusta ( Ga.) Constitutionalist, 230
Bailey, Gamaliel, 147
Bainbridge, Henry, 125, 128
Baltimore convention (Dem., 1860), 278-79
Bank of Augusta v. Earle, 159
Bank of the United States, 113, 118
Bankruptcy clause, 106, 201
Banks, Nathaniel P., 92
Bates, Edward, 134, 297
Bay, Samuel M., 130
Beecher, Henry Ward, 232
Bell, John, 277, 279
Benjamin, Judah P., 95-96, 252, 272,275

-313-

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Slavery, Law, and Politics: The Dred Scott Case in Historical Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Slavery and Race in the American Constitutional System 7
  • 2 - Expansion and Slavery in National Politics 41
  • 3 - Toward Judicial Resolution 72
  • 4 - The Taney Court and Judicial Power 102
  • 5 - The Dred Scott Case in Missouri 121
  • 6 - Before the Supreme Court 151
  • 7 - The Opinion of the Court 183
  • 8 - Concurrence, Dissent, and Public Reaction 214
  • 9 - The Lecompton and Freeport Connections 244
  • 10 - Not Peace but a Sword 273
  • 11 - In the Stream of History 295
  • Selected Books for Further Reading 309
  • Index 313
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