The House of Bondage, Or, Charlotte Brooks and Other Slaves

By Octavia V. Rogers Albert | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVII.
A COLORED SOIDIER.

Colonel Douglass Wilson on the war--Color-bearer Planchiancio and Captain Caillioux--Joel Brinkley, a Yankee school-teacher, caned nearly to death.

AFTER my conversation with Uncle Cephas in the last chapter I did not get to see any one particularly for a month or more who could add materially to my story any thing that might interest you; but during the succeeding summer, after this last conversation, I met Colonel Douglass Wilson, a colored man of considerable prominence, not only in Louisiana, but in the nation. He and his family and my husband, daughter, and I were spending a vacation at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, a very popular watering-place on the Mississippi Sound. He and my husband were very great friends, and used to visit each other during our stay there. One day I said to him:

"Colonel, from what I have heard you say and learned of you generally, as a public man,

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The House of Bondage, Or, Charlotte Brooks and Other Slaves
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publisher's Note vi
  • Foreword - In Her Own Write vii
  • A Note from the Schomburg Center xxiii
  • Introduction xxvii
  • Works Cited xlii
  • Preface xlvii
  • Contents xlix
  • Introduction liii
  • The Author lvii
  • Chapter I - Charlotte Brooks 1
  • Chapter II - Charlotte's Story 7
  • Chapter III - Aunt Charlotte's Friends 14
  • Chapter IV - Cruel Masters 21
  • Chapter V - Great Tribulations 27
  • Chapter VI - A Kind Mistress 35
  • Chapter VII - Broken-Down Freedmen 42
  • Chapter VIII - The Curse of Whisky 49
  • Chapter IX - John and Lorendo 57
  • Chapter X - A Converted Catholic 65
  • Chapter XI - Prison Horrors 75
  • Chapter XII - Sallie Smith's Story 86
  • Chapter XIII - In the Woods 94
  • Chapter XIV - Uncle Stephen Jordon 101
  • Chapter XV - Counterfeit Free Papers 109
  • Chapter XVI - Uncle Cephas's Story 119
  • Chapter XVII - A Colored Soidier 129
  • Chapter XVIII - Negro Government 138
  • Chapter XIX - The Colored Delegates 148
  • Chapter XX - A Touching Incident 156
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 164

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.