The United States and Central America, 1944-1949: Perceptions of Political Dynamics

By Thomas M. Leonard | Go to book overview

Appendix
Biographical Sketches of U.S. Policymakers

William C. Affeld. Affeld joined the Foreign Service in 1931 following his graduation from the University of Minnesota. He served at Singapore, Kobe, and Hong Kong before being appointed as third secretary at Guatemala City in 1941. He remained there until 1945, when he became a political adviser to the Allied Expeditionary Force in Europe.

Norman Armour. After earning a Harvard law degree, Armour joined the Foreign Service in 1916. He served at several locations in Europe, the Far East, and Latin America until 1941, when he was designated as director of the Office of American Republics Affairs. In 1944 he was appointed as ambassador to Spain and later became a special assistant secretary of state.

William Tapley Bennett. Bennett was a native of Griffin, Georgia. He was employed as an economic analyst in the Foreign Service prior to military duty during World War II. Returning to the State Department in 1946, he served as a country and area specialist until he was named as acting assistant chief of the Division of Central America and Panama Affairs in 1949.

Barry T. Benson. Following World War I service with the navy, Benson worked as a salesman until he was appointed to the Federal Communications Commission in 1935. Two years later, he took a position with the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, where he stayed until 1939. He was then assigned as consul at the U.S. mission in Calcutta, India. Prior to a similar appointment at Managua, in 1945 - 47, he had also served at Bogotá and Pretoria.

Maurice M. Bernbaum. After graduating from Harvard in 1931, Bernbaum held various jobs in Washington, D.C., before joining the State Department in 1936. He served at Caracas prior to his 1945 appointment as vice-consul at Managua, where he stayed until December 1947.

Woodrow Borah. Borah was assigned to the Office of Strategic Services during World War II, before working for seven months in the State Department in 1945.

Spruille Braden. The son of an engineer, Braden pursued the same career in Latin America after graduating from Yale in 1914. During the years 1920 - 38, he was a delegate to several Latin American conferences. From 1938 to 1942, he served as minister to Colombia and from 1942 to 1945 as minister to Cuba. In October 1945

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The United States and Central America, 1944-1949: Perceptions of Political Dynamics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Costa Rica 15
  • 2 - El Salvador 47
  • 3 - Guatemala 75
  • 4 - Honduras 107
  • 5 - Nicaragua 127
  • Conclusion 153
  • Appendix Biographical Sketches of U.S. Policymakers 167
  • Notes 177
  • Bibliography 201
  • Index 211
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